Humanism

Publication Title: 
Hospital Progress

The nature of the physician-patient relationship underlies the professional's obligation to respect each person. Religion moves those involved in caring for the sick beyond professionalism to a profound sense of common humanity under the Father, of healing as a work of God, and of love as the primary bond with patients.

Author(s): 
Thomasma, D. C.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Administration Quarterly

This manuscript offers a new view of old and timeless values: the essential ethic of love, informed by contemporary European philosophies, and caring theory, as well as ancient poetry and wisdom traditions. It integrates some of the philosophical views of Levinas and Logstrup with Watson's Transpersonal Caring Theory.

Author(s): 
Watson, Jean
Publication Title: 
Nursing Administration Quarterly

A theory of ontological nature in caring administration has been developed from a Caring science perspective. Caritative leadership is named according to the motive, human love, and mercy, and its main idea is ministering to the patients. It consists of 5 theses in relation to the view of the human being: the caritas motive, dignity, measurement and meaning in health care, and the relationships in the caring culture. Without a clear vision of what care of the patients could be, there is the risk that ministering to the patient is lost in the demands of different stakeholders.

Author(s): 
Bondas, Terese E.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Science Quarterly

This column seeks to contribute to the understanding of the concept of sacrifice and its significance to nursing through an extensive account of relevant literature from the disciplines of theology, sociology, anthropology, and psychology. The review uncovered that in sacrificing something of value, individuals anticipate connecting with families, groups, society, and deities.

Author(s): 
Florczak, Kristine L.
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)

This article uses the five distinct perspectives on caring proposed by Morse et al (1990) to illustrate the relationship between love, intimacy and caring. Two distinct types of love, namely Agape (altruism/charity) and filia (brother love) are utilized in nursing. Only some caring relationships with patients reach an intimate level, and this is determined by patient characteristics to which the nurse responds. It is concluded that caring as a moral imperative is the most relevant to discussions on caring in nursing and the perspective on which the other four viewpoints hinge.

Author(s): 
Dowling, Maura
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association

The concept of the objet petit a is central to Lacan's theory of desire, which arguably represents his major contribution to psychoanalysis. It is an expression of the lack inherent in human beings, whose incompleteness and early helplessness produce a quest for fulfillment beyond the satisfaction of biological needs.

Author(s): 
Kirshner, Lewis A.
Publication Title: 
Contemporary Nurse

A variety of studies identify friendliness/being friendly in their findings however, no research reports on the phenomenon of nurse friendliness. Moreover, all prior findings are coincidental to the phenomenon under investigation, so nurse friendliness is superficially represented and poorly understood. In turn, the significance of nurse friendliness has gone unnoticed. Because the present study focused on nurse friendliness, it revealed a deeper dimension to this phenomenon and expanded prior, limited understandings.

Author(s): 
Geanellos, Rene
Publication Title: 
Issues in Mental Health Nursing

The concept of resiliency has been explored extensively in the fields of developmental psychology as an adaptive life process. Increasingly nurses have begun to study resiliency in a wide variety of settings and client populations. This article explores the concept of resiliency in nurses. Resiliency was described through the use of personal exemplar, tracing the author's odyssey of nursing homeless men in an emergency shelter. The author proposes that the traits of resiliency in nurses are widespread and largely unrecognized.

Author(s): 
McGee, Eileen M.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain): 1987)

In the first of a major new series, Stephen Wright considers what nursing from the heart means and why it is important to patients.

Author(s): 
Wright, Stephen
Publication Title: 
Nursing Philosophy: An International Journal for Healthcare Professionals

The discipline of nursing is still struggling with the differences that need to be clearly defined between the notions of care and nursing care. To be able to clarify this distinction, agreement must first be reached on the meaning of care itself. The present article proposes a conception of care in light of the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995). This philosopher's thought throws considerable light on the ontology of care, thanks especially to his focus on the deeper implications of human encounter.

Author(s): 
Lavoie, Mireille
De Koninck, Thomas
Blondeau, Danielle

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