Hyperoxia

Publication Title: 
Geriatrics & Gerontology International

Lifespan can be lengthened by genetic and environmental modifications. Study of these might provide valuable insights into the mechanism of aging. Low doses of radiation and short-term exposure to heat and high concentrations of oxygen prolong the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These might be caused by adaptive responses to harmful environmental conditions. Single-gene mutations have been found to extend lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. So far, the best-characterized system is the C.

Author(s): 
Honda, Yoko
Tanaka, Masashi
Honda, Shuji
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Physiology. Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Surfactant protein D (SP-D), a member of the collectin superfamily, modulates pulmonary inflammatory responses and innate immunity. Disruption of the SP-D gene in mice induces peribronchiolar inflammation, accumulation of large, foamy macrophages, increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) phospholipid, and pulmonary emphysema. We hypothesized that absence of SP-D aggravates hyperoxia-induced injury. To test this, SP-D-deficient (SP-D-/-) and wild-type (SP-D+/+) mice were exposed to 80% or 21% oxygen. Paradoxically, during 14 days of hyperoxia, SP-D-/- mice had 100% survival vs.

Author(s): 
Jain, Deepika
Atochina-Vasserman, Elena
Kadire, Helchem
Tomer, Yaniv
Inch, Adam
Scott, Pamela
Savani, Rashmin C.
Gow, Andrew J.
Beers, Michael F.
Publication Title: 
Pediatric Research

Prematurely born infants are often treated with supraphysiologic amounts of oxygen, which is associated with lung injury and the development of diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Complimentary responses between the lung and liver during the course of hyperoxic lung injury have been studied in adult animals, but little is known about this relationship in neonates. These studies tested the hypothesis that oxidant stress occurs in the livers of newborn mice in response to continuous hyperoxia exposure.

Author(s): 
Rogers, Lynette K.
Tipple, Trent E.
Britt, Rodney D.
Welty, Stephen E.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology

Maternally derived inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and IL-8, contribute to preterm delivery, low birth weight, and respiratory insufficiency, which are routinely treated with oxygen. Premature infants are at risk for developing adult-onset cardiac, metabolic, and pulmonary diseases. Long-term pulmonary consequences of perinatal inflammation are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that a hostile perinatal environment induces profibrotic pathways resulting in pulmonary fibrosis, including persistently altered lung structure and function.

Author(s): 
Velten, Markus
Britt, Rodney D.
Heyob, Kathryn M.
Welty, Stephen E.
Eiberger, Britta
Tipple, Trent E.
Rogers, Lynette K.
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