Hypnosis, Anesthetic

Publication Title: 
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

The aim of this study was to systematically review and critically appraise the evidence on the effectiveness of hypnosis for procedure-related pain and distress in pediatric cancer patients. A comprehensive search of major biomedical and specialist complementary and alternative medicine databases was conducted. Citations were included from the databases' inception to March 2005. Efforts were made to identify unpublished and ongoing research. Controlled trials were appraised using predefined criteria. Clinical commentaries were obtained for each study.

Author(s): 
Richardson, Janet
Smith, Joanna E.
McCall, Gillian
Pilkington, Karen
Publication Title: 
General Hospital Psychiatry

In burn treatment, hypnosis has been used for the alleviation of pain, the prevention and treatment of anxiety and depression, and the acceleration of wound healing. The successful application of hypnosis decreases the extensive medication needed. Furthermore, it provides a tool to patients with which they may experience more control in situations that are often experienced as overwhelming. Notwithstanding these important applications and the very positive terms with which the results of studies are generally described, hypnosis has mostly been neglected as a tool to help burn patients.

Author(s): 
Van der Does, A. J.
Van Dyck, R.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Induction of general anaesthesia can be distressing for children. Non-pharmacological methods for reducing anxiety and improving co-operation may avoid the adverse effects of preoperative sedation. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions in assisting induction of anaesthesia in children by reducing their anxiety, distress or increasing their co-operation. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1).

Author(s): 
Yip, Peggy
Middleton, Philippa
Cyna, Allan M.
Carlyle, Alison V.
Publication Title: 
Anesthesia and Analgesia

Hypnosis is a nonpharmacologic means for managing adverse surgical side effects. Typically, reviews of the hypnosis literature have been narrative in nature, focused on specific outcome domains (e.g., patients' self-reported pain), and rarely address the impact of different modes of the hypnosis administration. Therefore, it is important to take a quantitative approach to assessing the beneficial impact of adjunctive hypnosis for surgical patients, as well as to examine whether the beneficial impact of hypnosis goes beyond patients' pain and method of the administration.

Author(s): 
Montgomery, Guy H.
David, Daniel
Winkel, Gary
Silverstein, Jeffrey H.
Bovbjerg, Dana H.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

Clinical evidence for the effectiveness of hypnosis in the treatment of acute procedural pain was critically evaluated based on reports from randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). Results from the 29 RCTs meeting inclusion criteria suggest that hypnosis decreases pain compared to standard care and attention control groups and that it is at least as effective as comparable adjunct psychological or behavioral therapies. In addition, applying hypnosis in multiple sessions prior to the day of the procedure produced the highest percentage of significant results.

Author(s): 
Kendrick, Cassie
Sliwinski, Jim
Yu, Yimin
Johnson, Aimee
Fisher, William
Kekecs, Zoltán
Elkins, Gary
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Induction of general anaesthesia can be distressing for children. Non-pharmacological methods for reducing anxiety and improving co-operation may avoid the adverse effects of preoperative sedation. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions in assisting induction of anaesthesia in children by reducing their anxiety, distress or increasing their co-operation. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1).

Author(s): 
Yip, Peggy
Middleton, Philippa
Cyna, Allan M.
Carlyle, Alison V.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Induction of general anaesthesia can be distressing for children. Non-pharmacological methods for reducing anxiety and improving co-operation may avoid the adverse effects of preoperative sedation. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions in assisting induction of anaesthesia in children by reducing their anxiety, distress or increasing their co-operation.

Author(s): 
Manyande, Anne
Cyna, Allan M.
Yip, Peggy
Chooi, Cheryl
Middleton, Philippa
Publication Title: 
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry
Author(s): 
Halliday, A. M.
Mason, A. A.
Publication Title: 
Postgraduate Medicine
Author(s): 
Zelenik, J. S.
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Malaysia
Author(s): 
Mun, C. T.

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