Hypnosis

Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

Many nonpharmacologic (behavioral) techniques are being proposed for the therapy of essential hypertension. The research in this area is reviewed and divided roughly into two categories: the biofeedback and relaxation methodologies. While feedback can be used to lower pressures during laboratory training sessions, studies designed to alter basal blood pressure levels with biofeedback have not yet been reported. The absence of evidence for such changes through biofeedback limits the usefulness of this technique in hypertension control.

Author(s): 
Frumkin, K.
Nathan, R. J.
Prout, M. F.
Cohen, M. C.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

BACKGROUND: A comprehensive, but not systematic, review of the research on complementary and alternative treatments, specifically mind/body techniques, on musculoskeletal disease was conducted at Stanford University. The goals of the review were to establish a comprehensive literature review and provide a rationale for future research carrying the theme of "successful aging." METHODS: Computerized searches were conducted using MEDLINE, PsychInfo, Stanford Library, Dissertation Abstracts, Lexus-Nexus, the Internet as well as interviews conducted with practitioners and the elderly.

Author(s): 
Luskin, F. M.
Newell, K. A.
Griffith, M.
Holmes, M.
Telles, S.
DiNucci, E.
Marvasti, F. F.
Hill, M.
Pelletier, K. R.
Haskell, W. L.
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a structured review of eight mind-body interventions for older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and evidence for pain reduction in older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain in the following mind-body therapies: biofeedback, progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, guided imagery, hypnosis, tai chi, qi gong, and yoga. METHODS: Relevant studies in the MEDLINE, PsycINFO, AMED, and CINAHL databases were located. A manual search of references from retrieved articles was also conducted.

Author(s): 
Morone, Natalia E.
Greco, Carol M.
Publication Title: 
Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien

OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence supporting selected complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Author(s): 
Shen, Yi-Hao A.
Nahas, Richard
Publication Title: 
Psychological Bulletin

We report the results of meta-analyses on 3 types of free-response study: (a) ganzfeld (a technique that enhances a communication anomaly referred to as "psi"); (b) nonganzfeld noise reduction using alleged psi-enhancing techniques such as dream psi, meditation, relaxation, or hypnosis; and (c) standard free response (nonganzfeld, no noise reduction). For the period 1997-2008, a homogeneous data set of 29 ganzfeld studies yielded a mean effect size of 0.142 (Stouffer Z = 5.48, p = 2.13 x 10(-8)).

Author(s): 
Storm, Lance
Tressoldi, Patrizio E.
Di Risio, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Due to unsatisfactory results from conventional treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities are increasingly popular treatment alternatives. Unfortunately, most CAM clinical trials have been of poor quality, and the efficacies of these therapies have not been adequately elucidated, even through systematic reviews or meta-analyses. There is also a general lack of understanding of their mechanisms of action.

Author(s): 
Wu, Justin C. Y.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Anxiety during pregnancy is a common problem. Anxiety and stress could have consequences on the course of the pregnancy and the later development of the child. Anxiety responds well to treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and/or medication. Non-pharmacological interventions such as mind-body interventions, known to decrease anxiety in several clinical situations, might be offered for treating and preventing anxiety during pregnancy.

Author(s): 
Marc, Isabelle
Toureche, Narimane
Ernst, Edzard
Hodnett, Ellen D.
Blanchet, Claudine
Dodin, Sylvie
Njoya, Merlin M.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

BACKGROUND: A comprehensive, but not systematic, review of the research on complementary and alternative treatments, specifically mind/body techniques, on musculoskeletal disease was conducted at Stanford University. The goals of the review were to establish a comprehensive literature review and provide a rationale for future research carrying the theme of "successful aging." METHODS: Computerized searches were conducted using MEDLINE, PsychInfo, Stanford Library, Dissertation Abstracts, Lexus-Nexus, the Internet as well as interviews conducted with practitioners and the elderly.

Author(s): 
Luskin, F. M.
Newell, K. A.
Griffith, M.
Holmes, M.
Telles, S.
DiNucci, E.
Marvasti, F. F.
Hill, M.
Pelletier, K. R.
Haskell, W. L.
Publication Title: 
Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien

OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence supporting selected complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Author(s): 
Shen, Yi-Hao A.
Nahas, Richard
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: To assess the efficacy of non-pharmacological therapies for hot flushes (HFs) in women with breast cancer (BC). METHODS: Nine databases (MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), China Biology Medicine (CBM), and Wan Fang Database) were searched from their inceptions to October 2016. We also hand-searched reference lists of reviews and included articles, reviewed conference proceedings, and contacted experts.

Author(s): 
Tao, Wei-Wei
Tao, Xiao-Mei
Song, Chun-Li

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