Hypoglycemic Agents

Publication Title: 
Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy = Biomedecine & Pharmacotherapie

Embelia ribes (ER) has been documented in Ayurveda for treating various diseases, including diabetes mellitus (DM). The present systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy and safety of ER and its active bio-marker, embelin and its derivatives in the treatment of DM. Literature search was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Scifinder, and Google Scholar.

Author(s): 
Durg, Sharanbasappa
Veerapur, Veeresh P.
Neelima, Satrasala
Dhadde, Shivsharan B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

Methanolic extract (75%) of Terminalia chebula, Terminalia belerica, Emblica officinalis and their combination named 'Triphala' (equal proportion of above three plant extracts) are being used extensively in Indian system of medicine. They were found to inhibit lipid peroxide formation and to scavenge hydroxyl and superoxide radicals in vitro. The concentration of plant extracts that inhibited 50% of lipid peroxidation induced with Fe(2+)/ascorbate were food to be 85.5, 27, 74 and 69 micro g/ml, respectively.

Author(s): 
Sabu, M. C.
Kuttan, Ramadasan
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Terminalia chebula (Combretaceae) has been widely used in Ayurveda for the treatment of diabetes. In the present investigation, the chloroform extract of T. chebula seed powder was investigated for its antidiabetic activity in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using short term and long term study protocols. The efficacy of the extract was also evaluated for protection of renal functions in diabetic rats.

Author(s): 
Rao, Nalamolu Koteswara
Nammi, Srinivas
Publication Title: 
Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes: Official Journal, German Society of Endocrinology [and] German Diabetes Association

The aqueous extract of the fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. has been evaluated for its antidiabetic activity in streptozotocin (STZ) induced mild diabetic rats and compared with a known drug, tolbutamide. The oral effective dose (ED) of the extract was observed to be 200 mg/kg body weight, which produced a fall of 55.6% (p<0.01) in the oral glucose tolerance test.

Author(s): 
Murali, Y. K.
Anand, P.
Tandon, V.
Singh, R.
Chandra, R.
Murthy, P. S.
Publication Title: 
Phytotherapy research: PTR

There is documented evidence of the use of Terminalia chebula for various ailments in the Ayurvedic literature. The extract has been shown to possess glucose lowering activity and to improve insulin sensitivity in animal models of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study was carried out to study the dose response relationship of this extract in a rat model of metabolic syndrome. Six groups of rats were fed a high fructose diet (HFD) for a period of 20 days to induce metabolic syndrome. Three doses of fruit extract of T.

Author(s): 
Singh, Inderjeet
Singh, Pawan Kumar
Bhansali, Shobhit
Shafiq, Nusrat
Malhotra, Samir
Pandhi, Promila
Pal Singh, Amrit
Publication Title: 
Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin

Terminalia chebula has been widely used in India as a folk medicine. This study investigated the in vivo anti-hyperglycemia and anti-diabetic complication effects of the EtOAc-soluble portion of ethanolic extract of T. chebula fruit (EETC) containing 29.4% chebulic acid. Rats were divided into non-diabetic, untreated diabetic and diabetic groups. Streptozotocin (40 mg/kg body weight (BW))-induced diabetic rats were orally administered the aminoguanidine (100 mg/kg BW), high dose (500 mg/kg BW; HEETC) and low dose (100 mg/kg BW; LEETC) for 13 weeks.

Author(s): 
Kim, Ji-hoon
Hong, Chung-Oui
Koo, Yun-chang
Kim, Su-Jung
Lee, Kwang-Won
Publication Title: 
African journal of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicines: AJTCAM

Diabetes mellitus is an endocrinological disorder arising from insulin deficiency or due to ineffectiveness of the insulin produced by the body. This results in high blood glucose and with time, to neurological, cardiovascular, retinal and renal complications. It is a debilitating disease and affects the population of every country of the world. Around 200 million people of the world suffer from this disease and this figure is projected to rise to 300 million in the coming years.

Author(s): 
Rahmatullah, Mohammed
Azam, Md Nur Kabidul
Khatun, Zubaida
Seraj, Syeda
Islam, Farhana
Rahman, Md Atiqur
Jahan, Sharmin
Aziz, Md Shah
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Molecular Sciences

In the present study, we firstly compared rat intestinal ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity by different ethanol-aqueous extractions from the dried fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. The enzymatic assay showed that the 80% ethanol extract was more potent against maltase activity than both 50% and 100% ethanol extracts. By HPLC analysis, it was determined that the 80% ethanol extract had a higher content of chebulagic acid than each of 50% or 100% ethanol extract.

Author(s): 
Huang, Yi-Na
Zhao, Dong-Dong
Gao, Bo
Zhong, Kai
Zhu, Rui-Xue
Zhang, Yan
Xie, Wang-Jun
Jia, Li-Rong
Gao, Hong
Publication Title: 
Pharmaceutical Biology

CONTEXT: Diabetic nephropathy is one of the important microvascular complications of diabetes; however, the main problem remains is the control of progression of nephropathy in diabetes. Chebulic acid was selected, as tannins from Terminalia chebula are used as antidiabetic, renoprotective, antioxidant, hypotensive and an ?-glucosidase inhibitor. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we evaluated the effect of chebulic acid on ischemia reperfusion induced biochemical alteration in diabetic rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chebulic acid (CA) was isolated from T.

Author(s): 
Silawat, Narendra
Gupta, Vipin Bihari
Publication Title: 
BioFactors (Oxford, England)

The thiazolidinedione (TZDs) class of drugs are very effective for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). But due to the adverse effects of synthetic TZDs, their use is strictly regulated. The therapeutic actions of TZDs are mediated via modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?). Naturally occurring PPAR? modulators are more desirable as they lack the serious adverse effects caused by TZDs. This has prompted the exploitation of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine, for their potential PPAR? activity.

Author(s): 
Shyni, Gangadharan Leela
Kavitha, Sasidharan
Indu, Sasidharan
Arya, Anil Das
Anusree, Sasidharan Suseela
Vineetha, Vadavanath Prabhakaran
Vandana, Sankar
Sundaresan, Andikannu
Raghu, Kozhiparambil Gopalan

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