Imitative Behavior

Publication Title: 
Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review

Antisocial behavior and substance misuse are forms of problem behavior demonstrating considerable continuity over time. Accordingly, problem behavior influences interpersonal contexts across the life course, which may result in the replication of coercive interactions and a problem behavior lifestyle within romantic relationships.

Author(s): 
Rhule-Louie, Dana M.
McMahon, Robert J.
Publication Title: 
Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin

Based on the recent literature indicating that nonconscious behavioral mimicry is partly goal directed, three studies examined, and supported, the hypothesis that people who are involved in a romantic relationship nonconsciously mimic an attractive opposite-sex other to a lesser extent than people not involved in a relationship. Moreover, Studies 2 and 3 revealed that romantically involved persons tended to mimic an attractive alternative less to the extent that they were more close to their current partner.

Author(s): 
Karremans, Johan C.
Verwijmeren, Thijs
Publication Title: 
Cognition & Emotion

How is admiration different from adoration? We provided one answer to this question by examining the pathways through which admiration and adoration linked to self-expansion in a questionnaire and an experimental (autobiographical recall of emotion episodes) study. Both emotions were associated with increased potential efficacy to accomplish goals (i.e., self-expansion), but different action tendencies accounted for these links.

Author(s): 
Schindler, Ines
Paech, Juliane
Lˆwenbr¸ck, Fabian
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Genetic Psychology

The authors investigated the relationship between children's ability to take the social perspective of another and their use of the causal attribution principle known as discounting in assessing others' kindness in helping. The participants (N = 153), 7 to 16 years old, were interviewed in a township bordering Johannesburg. Each participant was administered 2 perspective-taking tasks and a series of vignettes, based on prosocial versus self-interested motives, assessing perceptions of kindness in helping.

Author(s): 
Mendelsohn, M.
Straker, G.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Genetic Psychology

The authors investigated the relationship between children's ability to take the social perspective of another and their use of the causal attribution principle known as discounting in assessing others' kindness in helping. The participants (N = 153), 7 to 16 years old, were interviewed in a township bordering Johannesburg. Each participant was administered 2 perspective-taking tasks and a series of vignettes, based on prosocial versus self-interested motives, assessing perceptions of kindness in helping.

Author(s): 
Mendelsohn, M.
Straker, G.
Publication Title: 
Shinrigaku Kenkyu: The Japanese Journal of Psychology

The present experiment was to examine the influence of perceived attitudes of mother models on preschool children's aggressive or prosocial behavior. Based on the score of CCP (children's cognition of parents) Test, sixty four-year-olds were selected and then modeling sessions were administered to them. Their mothers and kindergarten teachers were asked to answer a questionnaire on aggression and altruism of children in daily life situations. Mothers were also required to make self-ratings on their aggression, altruism and rearing attitudes. The following results were obtained.

Author(s): 
Morishita, M.
Publication Title: 
Neuropsychology Review

Neuropsychology has customarily taken a molecular and myopic view of executive functioning, concentrating largely on those proximal processes of which it may be comprised. Although commendable as a starting point, such an approach can never answer the question, "Why executive functioning?" The present paper encourages neuropsychologists to contemplate the longer-term, functional nature of the executive functions (EFs), using an evolutionary perspective.

Author(s): 
Barkley, R. A.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Science

Feelings of elevation, elicited by witnessing another person perform a good deed, have been hypothesized to motivate a desire to help others. However, despite growing interest in the determinants of prosocial behavior, there is only limited evidence that elevation leads to increases in altruistic behavior. In two experiments, we tested the relationship between elevation and helping behavior.

Author(s): 
Schnall, Simone
Roper, Jean
Fessler, Daniel M. T.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Evolutionary Biology

The evolutionary foundations of helping among nonkin in humans have been the object of intense debates in the past decades. One thesis has had a prominent influence in this debate: the suggestion that genuine altruism, strictly defined as a form of help that comes at a net fitness cost for the benefactor, might have evolved owing to cultural transmission. The gene-culture coevolution literature is wont to claim that cultural evolution changes the selective pressures that normally act to limit the emergence of altruistic behaviours.

Author(s): 
AndrÈ, J.-B.
Morin, O.
Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

Motor simulation is important for imitation, action understanding, and a wide range of social cognitive skills. Furthermore, the neuropeptide hormone Oxytocin (OT) has also been related to social information processing in humans, improving perception of social stimuli and increasing altruism and trust. Surprisingly, however, a direct link between OT and motor simulation has never been systematically investigated. The current study examined this question using the imitation-inhibition task, a paradigm used to investigate automatic imitation behaviour and motor simulation.

Author(s): 
De Coster, Lize
Mueller, Sven C.
T'Sjoen, Guy
De Saedeleer, Lien
Brass, Marcel

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