Indians, North American

Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Dietetic Association

This article reviews the primary health problems of African-American, Hispanic-American, Asian/Pacific Islander-American, and Native-American elders. The goal is to familiarize practicing dietitians with the differences in longevity, disease spectrum, and functional status (where data are available) for each of these ethnic groups. These data should be of assistance in making decisions regarding dietary counseling for ethnic elders. It is acknowledged that most data accumulated according to race do not accurately measure ethnicity.

Author(s): 
Bernard, M. A.
Lampley-Dallas, V.
Smith, L.
Publication Title: 
Diabetes

Telomeres play a central role in cellular aging, and shorter telomere length has been associated with age-related disorders including diabetes. However, a causal link between telomere shortening and diabetes risk has not been established. In a well-characterized longitudinal cohort of American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Family Study, we examined whether leukocyte telomere length (LTL) at baseline predicts incident diabetes independent of known diabetes risk factors.

Author(s): 
Zhao, Jinying
Zhu, Yun
Lin, Jue
Matsuguchi, Tet
Blackburn, Elizabeth
Zhang, Ying
Cole, Shelley A.
Best, Lyle G.
Lee, Elisa T.
Howard, Barbara V.
Publication Title: 
Aging

Telomeres play a central role in cellular senescence and are associated with a variety of age-related disorders such as dementia, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. Telomere length varies greatly among individuals of the same age, and is heritable. Here we performed a genome-wide linkage scan to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing leukocyte telomere length (LTL) measured by quantitative PCR in 3,665 American Indians (aged 14-93 years) from 94 large, multi-generational families.

Author(s): 
Zhu, Yun
Voruganti, V. Saroja
Lin, Jue
Matsuguchi, Tet
Blackburn, Elizabeth
Best, Lyle G.
Lee, Elisa T.
MacCluer, Jean W.
Cole, Shelley A.
Zhao, Jinying
Publication Title: 
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

Religious discussion of human organs and tissues has concentrated largely on donation for therapeutic purposes. The retrieval and use of human tissue samples in diagnostic, research, and education contexts have, by contrast, received very little direct theological attention. Initially undertaken at the behest of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, this essay seeks to explore the theological and religious questions embedded in nontherapeutic use of human tissue.

Author(s): 
Campbell, Courtney S.
Publication Title: 
Contemporary Nurse

The paper presents a historically unique partnership between an American Southwestern, Catholic faith-based, urban hospital and a program it sponsored on the spirituality of American Indian Traditional Indian Medicine (TIM) by a Comanche medicine man. A discussion is offered on the cultural partnerships, experiences and benefits achieved through the cultural accommodations of these spiritual beliefs and practices within this healthcare system.

Author(s): 
Hubbert, Ann O.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy

Chaplains serving in the health care context provide a ministry to dying patients of inestimable worth as they comfort patients in the last chapter of the journey by being present, listening, and caring. Chaplains also play another important role, helping patients clarify ways in which their beliefs and values might influence health care decisions. This paper reviewed the current trends of spiritual diversity alongside the aging of a large Baby Boomer cohort.

Author(s): 
Ai, Amy L.
McCormick, Thomas R.
Publication Title: 
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research (Online)

Using Community-based and Tribal Participatory Research (CBPR/TPR) approaches, an academic-tribal partnership between the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute and the Suquamish and Port Gamble S'Klallam Tribes developed a culturally grounded social skills intervention to promote increased cultural belonging and prevent substance abuse among tribal youth.

Author(s): 
Donovan, Dennis M.
Thomas, Lisa Rey
Sigo, Robin Little Wing
Price, Laura
Lonczak, Heather
Lawrence, Nigel
Ahvakana, Katie
Austin, Lisette
Lawrence, Albie
Price, Joseph
Purser, Abby
Bagley, Lenora
Publication Title: 
Cardiology in Review

Native American medicine provides an approach to the treatment of cardiovascular disease that is unique and that can complement modern medicine treatments. Although specific practices among the various Native American tribes (Nations) can vary, there is a strong emphasis on the power of shamanism that can be supplemented by the use of herbal remedies, sweat lodges, and special ceremonies. Most of the practices are passed down by oral tradition, and there is specific training regarding the Native American healer.

Author(s): 
Nauman, Eileen
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the History of Medicine

In January 1952 a team of medical researchers from Cornell Medical College learned that tuberculosis raged untreated on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. These researchers, led by Walsh McDermott, recognized a valuable opportunity for medical research, and they began a ten-year project to evaluate the efficacy of new antibiotics and test the power of modern medicine to improve the health conditions of an impoverished rural society. The history of this endeavor exposes a series of tensions at the heart of medical research and practice.

Author(s): 
Jones, David S.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Circumpolar Health

BACKGROUND: Subsistence norms are part of the "ecosophy" or ecological philosophy of Alaska Native Peoples in the sub-Arctic, such as the Inupiat of Seward Peninsula. This kind of animistic pragmatism is a special source of practical wisdom that spans over thousands of years and which has been instrumental in the IÒupiat's struggle to survive and thrive in harsh and evolving environments.

Author(s): 
Anthony, Raymond

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Indians, North American