Infertility

Publication Title: 
Fertility and Sterility

OBJECTIVE: To examine the theoretical and methodologic rationales for the use of sham acupuncture controls in trials of adjuvant acupuncture for in vitro fertilization (IVF), and to identify the drawbacks of using a sham acupuncture control that may have its own effects on the pregnancy outcome. BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has typically been tested in trials that evaluate subjective, patient-reported outcomes such as pain. Ratings of pain and similar subjective states can be strongly influenced by respondents' prejudgments, preferences, and expectations about treatment benefits.

Author(s): 
Manheimer, Eric
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: In 2007, Craig et al. reported the results of a randomized controlled trial in which a standardized acupuncture protocol performed on the day of embryo transfer (ET) resulted in lower pregnancy rates after in vitro fertilization (IVF). Between 2005 and 2007, the Craig protocol was used by one of the authors (LHR) at an infertility clinic unaffiliated with the Craig et al. trial.

Author(s): 
Hullender Rubin, Lee E.
Opsahl, Michael S.
Taylor-Swanson, Lisa
Ackerman, Deborah L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Internet Research

BACKGROUND: Medical treatments with no direct effect (like homeopathy) or that cause harm (like bloodletting) are common across cultures and throughout history. How do such treatments spread and persist? Most medical treatments result in a range of outcomes: some people improve while others deteriorate. If the people who improve are more inclined to tell others about their experiences than the people who deteriorate, ineffective or even harmful treatments can maintain a good reputation.

Author(s): 
de Barra, Mícheál
Eriksson, Kimmo
Strimling, Pontus
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine

BACKGROUND: Throughout history women have tried to control or enhance their fertility using herbal remedies, with various levels of societal support. Caribbean folk medicine has been influenced by European folk medicine, either through the early Spanish and French settlers or through the continuous immigration of Spanish-speaking peoples from Venezuela. Some folk uses are ancient and were documented by Galen and Pliny the Elder. METHODS: Thirty respondents, ten of whom were male were interviewed from September 1996 to September 2000.

Author(s): 
Lans, Cheryl
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are increasingly utilised for resolving difficulties conceiving. These technologies are expensive to both the public purse and the individual consumers. Acupuncture is widely used as an adjunct to ART with indications that it may assist reducing the time to conception and increasing live birth rates. Heterogeneity is high between treatment protocols.

Author(s): 
Smith, Caroline A.
Grant, Suzanne
Lyttleton, Jane
Cochrane, Suzanne
Publication Title: 
BMJ (Clinical research ed.)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether acupuncture improves rates of pregnancy and live birth when used as an adjuvant treatment to embryo transfer in women undergoing in vitro fertilisation. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: Medline, Cochrane Central, Embase, Chinese Biomedical Database, hand searched abstracts, and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Manheimer, Eric
Zhang, Grant
Udoff, Laurence
Haramati, Aviad
Langenberg, Patricia
Berman, Brian M.
Bouter, Lex M.
Publication Title: 
BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
Author(s): 
Pinborg, Anja
Loft, Anne
Andersen, Anders Nyboe
Publication Title: 
BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
Author(s): 
Clarke, Mike
Publication Title: 
Fertility and Sterility

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among couples seeking fertility care and to identify the predictors of CAM use in this population. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Eight community and academic infertility practices. PATIENT(S): A total of 428 couples presenting for an infertility evaluation. INTERVENTION(S): Interviews and questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine therapy.

Author(s): 
Smith, James F.
Eisenberg, Michael L.
Millstein, Susan G.
Nachtigall, Robert D.
Shindel, Alan W.
Wing, Holly
Cedars, Marcelle
Pasch, Lauri
Katz, Patricia P.
Infertility Outcomes Program Project Group
Publication Title: 
Fertility and Sterility

OBJECTIVE: To examine the theoretical and methodologic rationales for the use of sham acupuncture controls in trials of adjuvant acupuncture for in vitro fertilization (IVF), and to identify the drawbacks of using a sham acupuncture control that may have its own effects on the pregnancy outcome. BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has typically been tested in trials that evaluate subjective, patient-reported outcomes such as pain. Ratings of pain and similar subjective states can be strongly influenced by respondents' prejudgments, preferences, and expectations about treatment benefits.

Author(s): 
Manheimer, Eric

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