Injections, Intra-Articular

Publication Title: 
Clinical Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of conservative therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome. DATA SOURCES: A computer-aided search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration was conducted for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from January 1985 to May 2006. REVIEW METHODS: RCTs were included if: (1) the patients, with clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome, had not previously undergone surgical release, (2) the efficacy of one or more conservative treatment options was evaluated, (3) the study was designed as a randomized controlled trial.

Author(s): 
Piazzini, D. B.
Aprile, I.
Ferrara, P. E.
Bertolini, C.
Tonali, P.
Maggi, L.
Rabini, A.
Piantelli, S.
Padua, L.
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

Temporomandibular joint disorders are common in adults; as many as one third of adults report having one or more symptoms, which include jaw or neck pain, headache, and clicking or grating within the joint. Most symptoms improve without treatment, but various noninvasive therapies may reduce pain for patients who have not experienced relief from self-care therapies.

Author(s): 
Buescher, Jennifer J.
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

Temporomandibular joint disorders are common in adults; as many as one third of adults report having one or more symptoms, which include jaw or neck pain, headache, and clicking or grating within the joint. Most symptoms improve without treatment, but various noninvasive therapies may reduce pain for patients who have not experienced relief from self-care therapies.

Author(s): 
Buescher, Jennifer J.
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Over 70% of people in developed countries develop low back pain (LBP) at some time. But recovery is not always favourable: 82% of non recent-onset patients still experience pain 1 year later. Many patients with chronic LBP who were initially told that their natural history was good spend months or years seeking relief. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatments? What are the effects of injection therapy? What are the effects of non-drug treatments?

Author(s): 
Chou, Roger
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

Knee osteoarthritis is a common disabling condition that affects more than one-third of persons older than 65 years. Exercise, weight loss, physical therapy, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and braces or heel wedges decrease pain and improve function. Acetaminophen, glucosamine, ginger, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM-e), capsaicin cream, topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acupuncture, and tai chi may offer some benefit. Tramadol has a poor trade-off between risks and benefits and is not routinely recommended.

Author(s): 
Ringdahl, Erika
Pandit, Sandesh
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

Temporomandibular joint disorders are common in adults; as many as one third of adults report having one or more symptoms, which include jaw or neck pain, headache, and clicking or grating within the joint. Most symptoms improve without treatment, but various noninvasive therapies may reduce pain for patients who have not experienced relief from self-care therapies.

Author(s): 
Buescher, Jennifer J.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of conservative therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome. DATA SOURCES: A computer-aided search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration was conducted for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from January 1985 to May 2006. REVIEW METHODS: RCTs were included if: (1) the patients, with clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome, had not previously undergone surgical release, (2) the efficacy of one or more conservative treatment options was evaluated, (3) the study was designed as a randomized controlled trial.

Author(s): 
Piazzini, D. B.
Aprile, I.
Ferrara, P. E.
Bertolini, C.
Tonali, P.
Maggi, L.
Rabini, A.
Piantelli, S.
Padua, L.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

OBJECTIVE: To examine the therapeutic efficacy of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in rabbits with experimental osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Experimental OA was induced in rabbits by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). In the first study, rabbits (six in each group) received intramuscular injections of GlcNAc or normal saline three times a week starting 1 week postoperatively. In the second study, rabbits (eight in each group) were injected intra-articularly with GlcNAc (either once or twice a week) or normal saline.

Author(s): 
Shikhman, A. R.
Amiel, D.
D'Lima, D.
Hwang, S.-B.
Hu, C.
Xu, A.
Hashimoto, S.
Kobayashi, K.
Sasho, T.
Lotz, M. K.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Sports Medicine

BACKGROUND: Prolotherapy is an alternative therapy for chronic musculoskeletal injury including joint laxity. The commonly used injectant, D-glucose (dextrose), is hypothesized to improve ligament mechanics and decrease pain through an inflammatory mechanism. No study has investigated the mechanical effects of prolotherapy on stretch-injured ligaments. HYPOTHESES: Dextrose injections will enlarge cross-sectional area, decrease laxity, strengthen, and stiffen stretch-injured medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) compared with controls.

Author(s): 
Jensen, Kristina T.
Rabago, David P.
Best, Thomas M.
Patterson, Jeffrey J.
Vanderby, Ray
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition

Green tea, a product of the dried leaves of Camellia sinensis, is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. The polyphenolic compounds from green tea (PGT) possess antiinflammatory properties. We investigated whether PGT can afford protection against autoimmune arthritis and also examined the immunological basis of this effect using the rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Author(s): 
Kim, Hong Ro
Rajaiah, Rajesh
Wu, Qing-Li
Satpute, Shailesh R.
Tan, Ming T.
Simon, James E.
Berman, Brian M.
Moudgil, Kamal D.

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