Injections, Subcutaneous

Publication Title: 
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature for, and critically appraise, randomized controlled trials of any type of complementary and alternative therapies for labor pain. STUDY DESIGN: Six electronic databases were searched from their inception until July 2003. The inclusion criteria were that they were prospective, randomized controlled trials, involved healthy pregnant women at term, and contained outcome measures of labor pain. RESULTS: Our search strategy found 18 trials. Six of these did not meet our inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Huntley, Alyson L.
Coon, Joanna Thompson
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Intracutaneous or subcutaneous injection of sterile water is rapidly gaining popularity as a method of pain relief in labour and it is therefore essential that it is properly evaluated. Adequate analgesia in labour is important to women worldwide. Sterile water injection is inexpensive, requires basic equipment, and appears to have few side effects. It is purported to work for labour pain.

Author(s): 
Derry, Sheena
Straube, Sebastian
Moore, R. Andrew
Hancock, Heather
Collins, Sally L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to chart the experiences of homeopathic injectables prescribing practitioners with regard to safety issues and the extent in which these practitioners would feel restricted in case subcutaneously administered homeopathics were banned. DESIGN: This was a survey among practitioners who prescribe homeopathic injectables in 12 European countries. SUBJECTS: Data were gathered from 1693 doctors experienced in the use of homeopathic injectables for subcutaneous use. The data are based on experience with an estimated 36 million patient contacts.

Author(s): 
Baars, Erik W.
Adriaansen-Tennekes, Ruth
Eikmans, Karin J. L.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature for, and critically appraise, randomized controlled trials of any type of complementary and alternative therapies for labor pain. STUDY DESIGN: Six electronic databases were searched from their inception until July 2003. The inclusion criteria were that they were prospective, randomized controlled trials, involved healthy pregnant women at term, and contained outcome measures of labor pain. RESULTS: Our search strategy found 18 trials. Six of these did not meet our inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Huntley, Alyson L.
Coon, Joanna Thompson
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland)

BACKGROUND: The 2 Cohort randomised PrefHer trial examined the preferences of HER2+ve primary breast cancer patients for intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) delivery of trastuzumab via a Single Injectable Device (SID) or hand-held syringe (HHS). The novel approach and design of the study permitted an in-depth exploration of patients' experiences, the impact that different modes of delivery had on patients' well-being and implications for future management.

Author(s): 
Fallowfield, L.
Osborne, S.
Langridge, C.
Monson, K.
Kilkerr, J.
Jenkins, V.
Publication Title: 
Revista Brasileira De Medicina
Author(s): 
Wolffenbüttel, E.
Publication Title: 
Archives Internationales De Pharmacodynamie Et De Thérapie

This study deals with the interactions of cocaine with barbital, pentobarbital and ethanol in nontolerant and tolerant male Sprague-Dawley rats. Cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellets implanted s.c. in rats prior to the i.p. injections of sodium barbital (150 mg/kg dose once daily for 4 days) potentiated the hypothermic response 2 hr after the barbital injection, when maximum hypothermia occurred. The s.c. implantation of the same type of pellets prior to the i.p.

Author(s): 
Misra, A. L.
Pontani, R. B.
Vadlamani, N. L.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature for, and critically appraise, randomized controlled trials of any type of complementary and alternative therapies for labor pain. STUDY DESIGN: Six electronic databases were searched from their inception until July 2003. The inclusion criteria were that they were prospective, randomized controlled trials, involved healthy pregnant women at term, and contained outcome measures of labor pain. RESULTS: Our search strategy found 18 trials. Six of these did not meet our inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Huntley, Alyson L.
Coon, Joanna Thompson
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia

OBJECTIVE: To provide experience of monitoring the level of hypnosis with the Cerebral State Monitor (CSM), a device extracting a single numerical variable between 0 and 100 from the electroencephalogram in dogs sedated with medetomidine during dental scale removal. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective observational study. Animals Nine female Beagle dogs weighing 13.3 +/- 1.3 kg. METHODS: Cerebral state index (CSI) and burst suppression ratio (BSR) were recorded from sub-dermal needle electrodes in dogs sedated after subcutaneous injection of 114 +/- 11 microg kg(-1) medetomidine.

Author(s): 
Bollen, Peter J. A.
Saxtorph, Henrik
Publication Title: 
Annales De Dermatologie Et De Vénéréologie

BACKGROUND: Injections of botulinum toxin type A are extremely effective in treating palmar hyperhidrosis. The main problem is pain during injections in the palms and pulp of the fingers. Anaesthesia of the hands using Emla and analgesia with an equimolar mixture of oxygen/nitrous oxide are occasionally disappointing. We analysed the value of hypnosis in reducing injection pain.

Author(s): 
Maillard, H.
Bara, C.
Célérier, P.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Injections, Subcutaneous