Insulin Resistance

Publication Title: 
Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Geriatrics

The potential link between aging and insulin signaling has attracted substantial attention since several decades ago, on the basis of evidence including age-related increase in incidence of insulin resistance, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in accelerated aging syndromes and lifespan extension by caloric restriction in rodents. In addition, the intensive investigations in C.

Author(s): 
Kaneki, M.
Publication Title: 
Cell Cycle (Georgetown, Tex.)

Although it has been known since 1917 that calorie restriction (CR) decelerates aging, the topic remains highly controversial. What might be the reason? Here I discuss that the anti-aging effect of CR rules out accumulation of DNA damage and failure of maintenance as a cause of aging. Instead, it suggests that aging is driven in part by the nutrient-sensing TOR (target of rapamycin) network. CR deactivates the TOR pathway, thus slowing aging and delaying diseases of aging.

Author(s): 
Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Restriction of dietary methionine by 80% slows the progression of aged-related diseases and prolongs lifespan in rodents. A salient feature of the methionine restriction phenotype is the significant reduction of adipose tissue mass, which is associated with improvement of insulin sensitivity. These beneficial effects of MR involve a host of metabolic adaptations leading to increased mitochondrial biogenesis and function, elevated energy expenditure, changes of lipid and carbohydrate homeostasis, and decreased oxidative damage and inflammation.

Author(s): 
Perrone, Carmen E.
Malloy, Virginia L.
Orentreich, David S.
Orentreich, Norman
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Starting from young to very old subjects, aging is associated with a progressive remodeling. Such an age-dependent remodeling process mainly affects anthropometrics, endocrine and thus, also metabolic factors. Interestingly, it occurs in some individuals successfully, while in others unsuccessfully. Centenarians in good health conditions are a very selected group of subjects representing an exceptional condition. Why the centenarians reach the extreme human life span is still unknown.

Author(s): 
Barbieri, M.
Gambardella, A.
Paolisso, G.
Varricchio, M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To explore measures of metabolic syndrome and glucose metabolism in families with exceptional longevity. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: A university hospital in Leiden, the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred twenty-one offspring of nonagenarian siblings, who were enriched for familial factors promoting longevity, and 113 of their partners. No subject had diabetes mellitus. MEASUREMENTS: Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program.

Author(s): 
Rozing, Maarten P.
Westendorp, Rudi G. J.
de Craen, Anton J. M.
Frˆlich, Marijke
de Goeij, Moniek C. M.
Heijmans, Bastiaan T.
Beekman, Marian
Wijsman, Carolien A.
Mooijaart, Simon P.
Blauw, Gerard-Jan
Slagboom, P. Eline
van Heemst, Diana
Leiden Longevity Study Group
Publication Title: 
Clinical Interventions in Aging

Obesity is a global epidemic associated with aging-like cellular processes; in both aging and obesity, resistance to hormones such as insulin and leptin can be observed. Leptin is a circulating hormone/cytokine with central and peripheral effects that is released mainly by subcutaneous white adipose tissue. Centrally, leptin controls food intake, energy expenditure, and fat distribution, whereas it controls (among several others) insulin sensitivity, free fatty acids (FFAs) oxidation, and lipolysis in the periphery.

Author(s): 
Carter, Sophie
Caron, Alexandre
Richard, Denis
Picard, FrÈdÈric
Publication Title: 
Genetica

Glucose may drive some age-correlated impairments and may mediate some effects of dietary restriction on senescence. The hypothesis that cumulative deleterious effects of glucose may impair hypothalamic neurons during aging, leading to hyperinsulinemia and other age-correlated pathologies, is examined in the context of genetic influences. Susceptibility to toxic effects of gold-thio-glucose (GTG) is correlated with longevity across several mouse strains.

Author(s): 
Mobbs, C. V.
Publication Title: 
Medical Hypotheses

The insulin-sensitizing drug phenformin, in addition to its clinical utility in type II diabetes, has been reported to lower blood lipids, reduce body fat, enhance cellular immunity, and--in rodents--to increase mean lifespan and retard the development of growth of cancer. Initial studies with the insulin-sensitizing nutrient chromium picolinate indicate that it aids glucose tolerance in type II diabetes, lowers elevated LDL cholesterol, reduces body fat while increasing lean mass, and--in rats--increases median lifespan.

Author(s): 
McCarty, M. F.
Publication Title: 
British Medical Bulletin

Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) occurs predominantly after the age of 50 years but is not easy to distinguish from late onset insulin-dependent diabetes. It is likely that misclassification is rare in a Caucasian population. Whilst NIDDM is widely believed to be genetically determined, recent epidemiological observations have consistently revealed statistical associations between indices of poor fetal and infant growth with susceptibility to loss of glucose tolerance in adult life.

Author(s): 
Hales, C. N.
Publication Title: 
Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway: 1992). Supplement

Epidemiological studies have revealed strong and reproducible links between indices of poor fetal, and possibly infant, growth and susceptibility to the development of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance syndrome in adult life. The 'thrifty phenotype' hypothesis has been proposed to explain these associations.

Author(s): 
Hales, C. N.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Insulin Resistance