Intelligence

Publication Title: 
Neuroscience Letters

A cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) genotype (V/V homozygosity for I405V, NCBI dbSNP rs5882) has been associated with preservation of cognitive function in old age, in addition to its associations with exceptional longevity and cardiovascular disease. We tested the hypotheses that this polymorphism was associated with either level of cognitive function or lifetime cognitive change in 525 participants who took part in the Scottish Mental Survey of 1932. Participants took the same well-validated mental ability test at ages 11 and 79.

Author(s): 
Johnson, Wendy
Harris, Sarah E.
Collins, Patrick
Starr, John M.
Whalley, Lawrence J.
Deary, Ian J.
Publication Title: 
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience

Attempts to correlate measures of intellectual ability with localized anatomical imaging features of the brain have yielded variable findings distributed across frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes. To better define the gray and white matter correlates of intellectual ability and the effects of sex and age, we analyzed the brains of 105 healthy individuals, ages 7-57 years, who had a Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ) of 70 or higher. We examined associations of FSIQ with cortical thickness and with white matter volume throughout the cerebrum.

Author(s): 
Goh, Suzanne
Bansal, Ravi
Xu, Dongrong
Hao, Xuejun
Liu, Jun
Peterson, Bradley S.
Publication Title: 
Molecular Psychiatry

General intelligence is a robust predictor of important life outcomes, including educational and occupational attainment, successfully managing everyday life situations, good health and longevity. Some neuronal correlates of intelligence have been discovered, mainly indicating that larger cortices in widespread parieto-frontal brain networks and efficient neuronal information processing support higher intelligence. However, there is a lack of established associations between general intelligence and any basic structural brain parameters that have a clear functional meaning.

Author(s): 
Penke, L.
Maniega, S. MuÒoz
Bastin, M. E.
ValdÈs Hern·ndez, M. C.
Murray, C.
Royle, N. A.
Starr, J. M.
Wardlaw, J. M.
Deary, I. J.
Publication Title: 
Perceptual and Motor Skills

Of the 75 patients in the February 1977 "class" at the Longevity Research Institute, Santa Barbara, California, 11 volunteers were pre- and posttested (21- to 23-day intervals) with the MMPI, 13 with the California Psychological Inventory, and 17 with four subtests of the WAIS (total: 21 males, 10 females). Ten of the (total) 32 scales showed changes in the predicted, favorable direction, statistically significant at the .05 level or better by t test.

Author(s): 
Merzbacher, C. F.
Publication Title: 
Medical Hypotheses

Secular growth has been occurring in Europe for about 150 years. In the USA, since 1900, each new generation has increased by an average of 1in (2.54cm) in height and about 10lb (4.54kg) in weight. This trend has generally been viewed as favorable and tallness is admired, with the current ideal height for a man in the Western world being 6ft 2in (188cm). The Japanese have increased in height since the end of the Second World War by about 5in (12.7cm) in height and the Chinese have been growing at the rate of 2.54cm/decade since the 1950s.

Author(s): 
Samaras, T. T.
Storms, L. H.
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Health Psychology

Kanazawa (2006) has put forward an evolutionarily grounded theory which claims that individuals in wealthier and more egalitarian societies live longer and stay healthier not because they are wealthier or more egalitarian but because they are more intelligent (2006: 637). The claim rests on an argument which asserts that general intelligence is a solution to evolutionarily novel problems and that most dangers to health in contemporary society are evolutionarily novel. Kanazawa also claims that this relationship does not hold in sub-Saharan Africa.

Author(s): 
Dickins, T. E.
Sear, R.
Wells, A. J.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric Genetics: The Official Publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics

Although members of monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs are identical in genomic sequence, epigenetic mechanisms may occasion difference in gene expression and, consequently, twin discordance in complex traits. Recent work suggests that the epigenetic process of X-inactivation in female individuals may impact on intelligence and child behavioral problems. The timing of X-inactivation has been linked to chorionic splitting in MZ twins. Dichorionic monozygotic (DC-MZ) twinning, unlike monochorionic monozygotic (MC-MZ) twinning, occurs prior to the time of X-inactivation in female organisms.

Author(s): 
Peerbooms, O. L. J.
Wichers, M.
Jacobs, N.
Kenis, G.
Derom, C.
Vlietinck, R.
Thiery, E.
van Os, J.
Rutten, B. P. F.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

CONTEXT: Recent evidence suggests that the cognitive and social manifestations associated with Turner syndrome (TS) might be influenced by epigenetic factors in the form of genomic imprinting. However, due to small and heterogeneous samples, inconsistent results have emerged from these studies. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this prospective study was to establish the impact of genomic imprinting on neurocognitive abilities and social functioning in young girls with TS.

Author(s): 
Lepage, Jean-FranÁois
Hong, David S.
Hallmayer, Joachim
Reiss, Allan L.
Publication Title: 
European Psychiatry: The Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists

BACKGROUND: Though cognitive abilities in adulthood are largely influenced by individual genetic background, they have also been shown to be importantly influenced by environmental factors. Some of these influences are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Accordingly, polymorphic variants in the epigenetic gene DNMT3B have been linked to neurocognitive performance.

Author(s): 
CÛrdova-Palomera, A.
FatjÛ-Vilas, M.
Kebir, O.
GastÛ, C.
Krebs, M. O.
FaÒan·s, L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychiatric Research

Common variants of the FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) gene are implicated in psychotic and other disorders, via their role in regulating glucocorticoid receptor (GR) receptor sensitivity and effects on the broader function of the HPA system in response to stress.

Author(s): 
Green, Melissa J.
Raudino, Alessandra
Cairns, Murray J.
Wu, Jingqin
Tooney, Paul A.
Scott, Rodney J.
Carr, Vaughan J.
Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank

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