Intensive Care, Neonatal

Publication Title: 
ANS. Advances in nursing science

The final phase of a research project is the communication of findings in a manner that is acceptable within the scholarly norms of a scientific community. While there exists in nursing a willingness to embrace many forms of inquiry, there remains a hesitancy to communicate study outcomes in alternative formats that are congruent with the innovative methods employed. This article serves a dual purpose.

Author(s): 
Swanson, K. M.
Publication Title: 
Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing

This paper describes two studies that had three purposes: (a) to modify a parent-child interaction tool used previously in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU); (b) to demonstrate interrater reliability, Chronbach's Alpha reliability, and construct validity of the tool with adolescent mothers, and (c) to determine the ability of nurses engaged in usual work duties to observe maternal behaviors. The first study tested interrater reliability. Two NICU nurses were trained, observed adolescent mothers (n = 20) for the same 15 min, and then separately completed the measure.

Author(s): 
Christopher, S. E.
Bauman, K. E.
Veness-Meehan, K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association

The motives for the selection of primary patients in a neonatal intensive care unit were identified by 34 participants in a series of staff development programs on primary nursing. Motives were identified and ranked in order of importance. These included: (1) medical problems; (2) continuity of care; (3) impression of parents; (4) impression of the infant; (5) altruism; (6) nurses' self-esteem; and (7) impression of other staff. This paper considers the potential impact of these motives on the ability of the nurse to fulfill the expectations of primary nursing practice.

Author(s): 
Lind, R. F.
Sterk, M. B.
Publication Title: 
MCN. The American journal of maternal child nursing

This article describes a case study of infant massage for a neonate in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Infant massage is grounded in the theory of touch. In an NICU, the infant's tactile experiences can be uncomfortable or painful. This can lead to touch aversion. It is possible that providing pleasurable touch experiences through infant massage can help to develop touch acceptance. It is important to first assess the infant's readiness for massage according to his or her need and response.

Author(s): 
Lindrea, K. B.
Stainton, M. C.
Publication Title: 
Neonatal network: NN

Infant massage therapy is an inexpensive tool that should be utilized as part of the developmental care of the preterm infant. Nurses have been hesitant to begin massage therapy for fear of overstimulating the infant and because there has been insufficient research to prove its safety. Recent research, however, has shown that the significant benefits of infant massage therapy far outweigh the minimal risks. When infant massage therapy is properly applied to preterm infants, they respond with increased weight gains, improved developmental scores, and earlier discharge from the hospital.

Author(s): 
Beachy, Jodi M.
Publication Title: 
Minerva Pediatrica

Patients referred to Neonatal Intensive Care Units are particularly vulnerable because they are in a critical or sensitive period of development. When physicians were first able to really save preemies 40 years ago, not much thought was given to their brain development. The babies we care for are so early that the brain cells are still migrating to where they will finally rest in developed brain. We are shaped, to an extent, by our environment. In early life, the environment takes on a particularly important role.

Author(s): 
Ancora, G.
Publication Title: 
Neonatal network: NN

Infant massage therapy is an inexpensive tool that should be utilized as part of the developmental care of the preterm infant. Nurses have been hesitant to begin massage therapy for fear of overstimulating the infant and because there has been insufficient research to prove its safety. Recent research, however, has shown that the significant benefits of infant massage therapy far outweigh the minimal risks. When infant massage therapy is properly applied to preterm infants, they respond with increased weight gains, improved developmental scores, and earlier discharge from the hospital.

Author(s): 
Beachy, Jodi M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health

AIM: To obtain information on the practices and beliefs of junior doctors regarding neonatal pain and to compare this with best evidence. METHODS: A survey was distributed to junior doctors in five tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Sydney. Questions investigated the doctors' knowledge and treatment of pain in neonates, specifically regarding the perception and effects of pain, pain assessment tools, and the safety and efficacy of treatments for both procedural and long-term pain. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 33 junior doctors (77% response rate).

Author(s): 
Schultz, Meleesa
Loughran-Fowlds, Alison
Spence, Kaye
Publication Title: 
Advances in Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses

Infants born prematurely lose the protection of the uterus at a time of fetal development when the brain is growing and organizing exponentially. Environmental factors such as stress in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may play a role in altered brain maturation and neurobehavioral outcomes. Strategies aimed at reducing stress and promoting infant well-being are essential to improve neurologic and behavioral outcomes. Infant massage is a developmentally supported strategy aimed at promoting relaxation.

Author(s): 
Smith, Joan Renaud
Publication Title: 
Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews

Neurodevelopmental care, which is any NICU intervention undertaken to improve neurodevelopmental outcome, includes NICU design, nursing routines, nursing care plans, management of pain, feeding methods and, most importantly, encouraging parental involvement with their NICU infant. Recognition that sensory stimulation can overwhelm preterm infants and increase physiologic signs of stress led to attempts to reduce sensory input. More recent approaches judiciously add back soothing sensory input (e.g., therapeutic touch, soft music).

Author(s): 
Aucott, Susan
Donohue, Pamela K.
Atkins, Eileen
Allen, Marilee C.
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