Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

Publication Title: 
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: A Journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies

OBJECTIVE: To argue that that there has been a remarkable absence of discussion of the importance of parental love in the pediatric intensive care literature, and that this silence has been to the detriment of both medical and nursing pediatric intensive care practice. CONCLUSIONS: Research and anecdotal literature to date have focused on the negative changes that occur in the parental role during a child's pediatric intensive care unit admission.

Author(s): 
Gillis, Jonathan
Rennick, Janet
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE: Our objective with this study was to identify the nature and the role of spirituality from the parents' perspective at the end of life in the PICU and to discern clinical implications. METHODS: A qualitative study based on parental responses to open-ended questions on anonymous, self-administered questionnaires was conducted at 3 PICUs in Boston, Massachusetts. Fifty-six parents whose children had died in PICUs after the withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies participated.

Author(s): 
Robinson, Mary R.
Thiel, Mary Martha
Backus, Meghan M.
Meyer, Elaine C.
Publication Title: 
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: A Journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies

OBJECTIVE: Death is common in pediatric intensive care units. A child's death can shatter parents' personal identities, disrupt their relationships, and challenge their worldviews. Spirituality is a human characteristic that engenders transcendence; seeks meaning, purpose, and connection to others; and helps to construct a coherent worldview. Greater attention to spiritual needs may help parents cope with their loss. Our objective is to gain a deeper understanding of parents' spiritual needs during their child's death and bereavement.

Author(s): 
Meert, Kathleen L.
Thurston, Celia S.
Briller, Sherylyn H.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE: To investigate parents' perspectives on the desirability, content, and conditions of a physician-parent conference after their child's death in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). STUDY DESIGN: Audio-recorded telephone interviews were conducted with 56 parents of 48 children. All children died in the PICU of one of six children's hospitals in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN) 3 to 12 months before the study.

Author(s): 
Meert, Kathleen L.
Eggly, Susan
Pollack, Murray
Anand, K. J. S.
Zimmerman, Jerry
Carcillo, Joseph
Newth, Christopher J. L.
Dean, J. Michael
Willson, Douglas F.
Nicholson, Carol
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network
Publication Title: 
Anales De Pediatría (Barcelona, Spain: 2003)

The Bispectral Index (BIS) is a single numeric value that indicates the depth of hypnosis by estimating the level of electrical activity in the brain through analysis of the frequency bands in the electroencephalogram. The BIS was primarily developed to monitor the level of hypnosis during surgery and has recently begun to be used in critically-ill patients. Currently, there is little experience of the BIS in critically-ill children. We present 6 cases that illustrate the utility of BIS monitoring in the PICU.

Author(s): 
Mencía Bartolomé, S.
López-Herce Cid, J.
Lamas Ferreiro, A.
Borrego Domínguez, R.
Sancho Pérez, L.
Carrillo Alvarez, A.
Publication Title: 
Pediatric Emergency Care

OBJECTIVES: Sedation is a key component in the management of pediatric patients both in the pediatric emergency department (PED) and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) for the treatment of pain and anxiety. Bispectral (BIS) index monitoring has been developed to help clinicians assess degree of hypnosis with anesthesia and may be useful in these environments. METHODS: Literature searches were conducted through MEDLINE for case series/reports, retrospective studies, and randomized trials that evaluate the validity and applications of BIS monitoring in the PED and PICU.

Author(s): 
Dominguez, Troy E.
Helfaer, Mark A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

AIM: This article is a report of a randomized controlled trial of the effects of 'M' technique massage with or without mandarin oil compared to standard postoperative care on infants' levels of pain and distress, heart rate and mean arterial pressure after major craniofacial surgery. BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest in non-pharmacological interventions such as aromatherapy massage in hospitalized children to relieve pain and distress but well performed studies are lacking.

Author(s): 
de Jong, Marjan
Lucas, Cees
Bredero, Hansje
van Adrichem, Leon
Tibboel, Dick
Van Dijk, Monique
Publication Title: 
Journal of the Society of Pediatric Nurses: JSPN

ISSUES AND PURPOSE: To describe how African-American mothers' spirituality helped them cope during the time of their infants' hospitalization for a serious illness. DESIGN AND METHODS: Fourteen mothers whose infants were seriously ill in the early months of life were interviewed for this retrospective, descriptive study. RESULTS: The core theme related to prayer. Four mothers reported a strengthened faith, while two mothers continued to have difficulty relating to God or attending church.

Author(s): 
Wilson, S. M.
Miles, M. S.
Publication Title: 
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: A Journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies

OBJECTIVE: Death is common in pediatric intensive care units. A child's death can shatter parents' personal identities, disrupt their relationships, and challenge their worldviews. Spirituality is a human characteristic that engenders transcendence; seeks meaning, purpose, and connection to others; and helps to construct a coherent worldview. Greater attention to spiritual needs may help parents cope with their loss. Our objective is to gain a deeper understanding of parents' spiritual needs during their child's death and bereavement.

Author(s): 
Meert, Kathleen L.
Thurston, Celia S.
Briller, Sherylyn H.
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE: Our objective with this study was to identify the nature and the role of spirituality from the parents' perspective at the end of life in the PICU and to discern clinical implications. METHODS: A qualitative study based on parental responses to open-ended questions on anonymous, self-administered questionnaires was conducted at 3 PICUs in Boston, Massachusetts. Fifty-six parents whose children had died in PICUs after the withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies participated.

Author(s): 
Robinson, Mary R.
Thiel, Mary Martha
Backus, Meghan M.
Meyer, Elaine C.

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