Internal Medicine

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of an integrative medicine approach to the management of asthma compared to standard clinical care on quality of life (QOL) and clinical outcomes. METHODS: This was a prospective parallel group repeated measurement randomized design. Participants were adults aged 18 to 80 years with asthma. The intervention consisted of six group sessions on the use of nutritional manipulation, yoga techniques, and journaling. Participants also received nutritional supplements: fish oil, vitamin C, and a standardized hops extract.

Author(s): 
Kligler, Benjamin
Homel, Peter
Blank, Arthur E.
Kenney, Jeanne
Levenson, Hanniel
Merrell, Woodson
Publication Title: 
Forschende Komplementarmedizin (2006)

BACKGROUND: Homeopathy use continues to grow in many European countries, and some studies have examined the characteristics of patients using homeopathy within the general population. The aim of this study was to identify predictors for homeopathy use among internal medicine patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was conducted among all patients being referred to the Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine at Essen, Germany, over a 3-year period.

Author(s): 
Steel, Amie
Cramer, Holger
Leung, Brenda
Lauche, Romy
Adams, Jon
Langhorst, Jost
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

PURPOSE: To assess day-to-day emotions and the experiences that trigger these emotions for medical trainees in hospital settings. The overarching goal was to illuminate training experiences that affect professional behaviors of physicians. METHOD: This qualitative study, conducted April-June 2000, used semistructured, open-ended interviews, observations by a non-participant, and a self-report task at two inpatient services (internal medicine and pediatrics) at different hospitals within a single academic institution in the northwestern United States.

Author(s): 
Kasman, Deborah L.
Fryer-Edwards, Kelly
Braddock, Clarence H.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Questionnaires were distributed to 346 fourth-year students in nine medical schools. The students were asked to state their selected specialty and to rank the importance that each of 25 influences, listed as questionnaire items, had had in making their choice of specialty. Factor analysis showed that particular items were significantly associated with particular factors.

Author(s): 
Schwartz, R. W.
Haley, J. V.
Williams, C.
Jarecky, R. K.
Strodel, W. E.
Young, B.
Griffen, W. O.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

PURPOSE: To examine the feasibility of using the taxonomy of professional and unprofessional behaviors presented in the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM's) Project Professionalism to categorize ethical issues that undergraduate medical students perceive to be salient. METHOD: Beginning second-year medical students at the University of Washington School of Medicine (n = 120) were asked to respond to three open-ended questions about professional standards of conduct and peer evaluation.

Author(s): 
Robins, Lynne S.
Braddock, Clarence H.
Fryer-Edwards, Kelly A.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

PROBLEM STATEMENT AND BACKGROUND: The evaluation of professionalism often relies on the observation and interpretation of students' behaviors; however, little research is available regarding faculty's interpretations of these behaviors. METHOD: Interviews were conducted with 30 faculty, who were asked to respond to five videotaped scenarios in which students are placed in professionally challenging situations. Behaviors were catalogued by person and by scenario. RESULTS: There was little agreement between faculty about what students should and should not do in each scenario.

Author(s): 
Ginsburg, Shiphra
Regehr, Glenn
Lingard, Lorelei
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

PURPOSE: A new internal medicine call structure was implemented at two teaching hospitals at the University of Toronto, Canada, in 2009, motivated by patient safety concerns, new duty hours regulations, and dissatisfaction among attending physicians. This study aimed to determine attendings', residents', and students' experiences with the new structure and to look carefully for unintended consequences.

Author(s): 
Stroud, Lynfa
Oulanova, Olga
Szecket, Nicolas
Ginsburg, Shiphra
Publication Title: 
Health Communication

This article reviews the relation between social support and elder health, the social-support dimensions of religion, the relation between church attendance and elder health, the place of religion in the biopsychosocial model of medicine, and medical education's position on physician-patient communication about religion. It then examines the emergence of the topic of religion in actual visits. Data are 71 videotaped and transcribed, chronic-routine visits between 12 internal medicine physicians and their older patients. Religion was raised as a topic in 9 visits (13%).

Author(s): 
Robinson, Jeffrey D.
Jon F, Nussbaum
Publication Title: 
Nihon Naika Gakkai Zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Society of Internal Medicine
Author(s): 
Ikemi, Y.
Publication Title: 
Maryland Medical Journal (Baltimore, Md.: 1985)
Author(s): 
Lamping, C.

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