Ireland

Publication Title: 
Journal of Fish Biology

A time-resolved record of inhabited water depth, metabolic rate and trophic behaviour of the orange roughy Hoplostethus atlanticus was recovered from combined stable-isotope analyses of otolith and muscle tissue. The results demonstrate that H. atlanticus from the north-east Atlantic Ocean have a complex life history with three distinct depth-stratified life stages. Early juvenile H. atlanticus occupy relatively shallow habitats, juvenile H. atlanticus show a deep-demersal phase, rising at sexual maturity, and adult H. atlanticus exploit increasingly deep habitats with increasing age.

Author(s): 
Trueman, C. N.
Rickaby, R. E. M.
Shephard, S.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

HIV appeared in Ireland following an opiate epidemic in the early 1980s. Initially, however, the gay community mounted the only response to the spread of the virus while the implementation of early actions by the government was hampered by the constructions of the disease within Irish society. This paper considers the influence of the religious hierarchy in both the development of AIDS policy and in the shaping of public perceptions of the disease and those affected.

Author(s): 
Smyth, F.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

In common with some other ethnic and religious minorities whose forebears migrated from their country of origin, Irish Catholics in Britain are less well off than the host population in terms of socio-economic position and health. Results are presented from a Scottish study, where Catholic religion of origin mainly indicates Irish ancestry, and it is estimated that about one-third of the population is of significant Irish descent.

Author(s): 
Abbotts, J.
Williams, R.
Ford, G.
Publication Title: 
Sociology of Health & Illness

This paper considers the ways in which accounts from Glasgow Catholics diverge from those of Protestants and explores the reasons why people leave jobs, including health grounds. Accounts reveal experiences distinctive to Catholics, of health-threatening stress, obstacles to career progression within (mainly) private-sector organisations, and interactional difficulties which create particular problems for (mainly) middle class men. This narrows the employment options for upwardly mobile Catholics, who may then resort to self-employment or other similarly stressful options.

Author(s): 
Walls, Patricia
Williams, Rory
Publication Title: 
Nursing Inquiry

Attitudes of Catholic religious orders towards children and adults with an intellectual disability in postcolonial Ireland The purpose of this paper is to examine the intersecting roles of Catholic religious orders and psychiatrists in the development of residential care for people with an intellectual disability in Ireland during the fifty-year period after political autonomy from the UK in 1922.

Author(s): 
Sweeney, John
Publication Title: 
Reproductive Health Matters

Issues arising from the death of Savita Halappanavar in Ireland in October 2012 include the question of whether it is unethical to refuse to terminate a non-viable pregnancy when the woman's life may be at risk. In Catholic maternity services, this decision intersects with health professionals' interpretation of Catholic health policy on treatment of miscarriage as well as the law on abortion. This paper explores how these issues came together around Savita's death and the consequences for pregnant women and maternity services worldwide.

Author(s): 
Berer, Marge
Publication Title: 
Nursing Standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain): 1987)

Family planning gives individuals and couples control and choice over the number of children they have and the timing of their births. Developments in reproductive health have resulted in major changes in the options for family planning, providing more choice and control over fertility. This article explores reproductive health in the Republic of Cuba and the Republic of Ireland, with a focus on contraceptive use and termination of pregnancy as methods of family planning. The predominant religion in both countries is Catholicism, which promotes the right to life of the unborn child.

Author(s): 
Smyth, Suzie
Stronge, Shirley
Publication Title: 
European journal of human genetics: EJHG

In the debate on biobank regulation, arguments often draw upon findings in surveys on public attitudes. However, surveys on willingness to participate in research may not always predict actual participation rates. We compared hypothetical willingness as estimated in 11 surveys conducted in Sweden, Iceland, United Kingdom, Ireland, United States and Singapore to factual participation rates in 12 biobank studies. Studies were matched by country and approximate time frame.

Author(s): 
Johnsson, Linus
Helgesson, Gert
Rafnar, Thorunn
Halldorsdottir, Ingibjorg
Chia, Kee-Seng
Eriksson, Stefan
Hansson, Mats G.
Publication Title: 
Irish Journal of Medical Science

BACKGROUND: In 1994 Doll and colleagues published smoking mortality figures for British doctors over 40 years. AIMS: To assess smoking prevalence among junior doctors in a major Dublin teaching hospital. METHODS: One hundred and fourteen non-consultant doctors (NCHDs) at St James's Hospital received a confidential smoking questionnaire. RESULTS: One hundred and six NCHDs responded (93%). Three refused, five were not available. Ninety per cent were aged 24-35 years. Twenty-six per cent of the doctors had smoked for 10 to 15 years.

Author(s): 
Naji, N.
McLoughlin, H.
Connell, F. O.
Clancy, L.
Publication Title: 
Palliative Medicine

The warm welcome for modern advances in the care of the dying should not exclude the past in which there is much to be learned from the skills of our ancestors. A bilingual two-year qualitative research project into traditions associated with dying and death was undertaken. Research began in the archives available in the internationally recognized university folklore departments of Ireland and Scotland.

Author(s): 
Donnelly, S.

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