Iron Chelating Agents

Publication Title: 
International Journal of Obesity (2005)

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, and the Cochrane Library until January 2004. Hand-searches of relevant medical journals and bibliographies of identified articles were conducted.

Author(s): 
Pittler, M. H.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Obesity (2005)

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, and the Cochrane Library until January 2004. Hand-searches of relevant medical journals and bibliographies of identified articles were conducted.

Author(s): 
Pittler, M. H.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: The 70% methanol extract of Terminalia chebula Retz. fruit (TCME) was investigated for its in vitro iron chelating property and in vivo ameliorating effect on hepatic injury of iron overloaded mice. METHODS: The effect of fruit extract on Fe2+-ferrozine complex formation and Fe2+ mediated pUC-18 DNA breakdown was studied in order to find the in vitro iron chelating activity. Thirty-six Swiss Albino mice were divided into six groups of: blank, patient control and treated with 50, 100, 200 mg/kg b.w.

Author(s): 
Sarkar, Rhitajit
Hazra, Bibhabasu
Mandal, Nripendranath
Publication Title: 
Archivos Latinoamericanos De NutriciÛn

Iron is estimated to be deficient in the diets of one fifth of the world's population. Iron is commonly provided as a supplemental nutrient in industrialized countries for uses of choice. In other countries of the world, it may be required as an overt addition to the diet to prevent iron deficiency. This may be accomplished through fortification of a common food. As a micronutrient, iron has a relatively narrow range of safety--whether given as a supplement or fortificant, it must be in a high enough dose to be appreciably absorbed, but low enough to avoid toxicity.

Author(s): 
Jeppsen, R. B.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Obesity (2005)

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, and the Cochrane Library until January 2004. Hand-searches of relevant medical journals and bibliographies of identified articles were conducted.

Author(s): 
Pittler, M. H.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

Artemisinin is an important new antimalarial agent containing a bridged endoperoxide. The in vitro antimalarial activity of an artemisinin derivative, arteether, is antagonized by two iron chelators, pyridoxal benzoylhydrazone and 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyrid-4-one. Similarly, the acute toxicity of artemisinin in mice is antagonized by another chelator, deferoxamine-hydroxyethylstarch. A combination of artemisinin and hemin oxidizes erythrocyte membrane thiols in vitro, and this oxidation is also inhibited by an iron chelator.

Author(s): 
Meshnick, S. R.
Yang, Y. Z.
Lima, V.
Kuypers, F.
Kamchonwongpaisan, S.
Yuthavong, Y.
Publication Title: 
Chemical & Pharmaceutical Bulletin

Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene with endoperoxide bond, possesses potent antimalarial activity against the ring and late stage of chloroqine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria both in vitro and in vivo. The mode of antimalarial activity of artemisinin is iron-dependent. The aim of this study was to investigate the reactions of artemisinin with ferrous and ferric ions in aqueous buffer. Artemisinin generated a cycle of iron oxidation and reduction.

Author(s): 
Sibmooh, N.
Udomsangpetch, R.
Kujoa, A.
Chantharaksri, U.
Mankhetkorn, S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Chemical Society

Although the antimalarial agent artemisinin itself is not active against tuberculosis, conjugation to a mycobacterial-specific siderophore (microbial iron chelator) analogue induces significant and selective antituberculosis activity, including activity against multi- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The conjugate also retains potent antimalarial activity.

Author(s): 
Miller, Marvin J.
Walz, Andrew J.
Zhu, Helen
Wu, Chunrui
Moraski, Garrett
Möllmann, Ute
Tristani, Esther M.
Crumbliss, Alvin L.
Ferdig, Michael T.
Checkley, Lisa
Edwards, Rachel L.
Boshoff, Helena I.
Publication Title: 
Investigational New Drugs

Recent research suggests that altered redox control of melanoma cell survival, proliferation, and invasiveness represents a chemical vulnerability that can be targeted by pharmacological modulation of cellular oxidative stress. The endoperoxide artemisinin and semisynthetic artemisinin-derivatives including dihydroartemisinin (DHA) constitute a major class of antimalarials that kill plasmodium parasites through induction of iron-dependent oxidative stress.

Author(s): 
Cabello, Christopher M.
Lamore, Sarah D.
Bair, Warner B.
Qiao, Shuxi
Azimian, Sara
Lesson, Jessica L.
Wondrak, Georg T.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Iron chelators for the treatment of malaria have proven therapeutic activity in vitro and in vivo in both humans and mice, but their clinical use is limited by the unsuitable absorption and pharmacokinetic properties of the few available iron chelators. FBS0701, (S)3"-(HO)-desazadesferrithiocin-polyether [DADFT-PE], is an oral iron chelator currently in Phase 2 human studies for the treatment of transfusional iron overload.

Author(s): 
Ferrer, Patricia
Tripathi, Abhai K.
Clark, Martha A.
Hand, Carla Cerami
Rienhoff, Hugh Young
Sullivan, David J.

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