Iron

Publication Title: 
Dalton Transactions (Cambridge, England: 2003)

The health benefits of cranberries have long been recognized. However, the mechanisms behind its function are poorly understood. We have investigated the iron-binding properties of quercetin, the major phenolic phytochemical present in cranberries, and other selected phenolic compounds (chrysin, 3-hydroxyflavone, 3',4'-dihydroxy flavone, rutin, and flavone) in aqueous media using UV/vis, NMR and EPR spectroscopies and ESI-Mass spectrometry.

Author(s): 
Guo, Maolin
Perez, Carlos
Wei, Yibin
Rapoza, Elise
Su, Gregory
Bou-Abdallah, Fadi
Chasteen, N. D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry

Baicalein and baicalin, the major bioactive compounds found in the Chinese herb Scutellaria baicalensis, have been shown to be effective against cancer, bacterial infections and oxidative stress diseases. However, little is known about their mechanisms of action. To probe whether iron homeostasis modulation may play a role in their bioactivity, we have investigated their iron binding characteristics under physiologically relevant conditions.

Author(s): 
Perez, Carlos A.
Wei, Yibin
Guo, Maolin
Publication Title: 
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology

OBJECTIVE: Vascular oxidative stress and inflammation are contributing factors in atherosclerosis. We recently found that the iron chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO), suppresses NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress and expression of cellular adhesion molecules in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The objective of the present study was to investigate whether and how LPS and iron enhance, and DFO inhibits, NADPH oxidase activity in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs).

Author(s): 
Li, Lixin
Frei, Balz
Publication Title: 
Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology: CJASN

BACKGROUND: Because of the risk of performing renal biopsies in children with co-morbid conditions, we carried out this study to identify candidate protein biomarkers in the urine of HIV-infected children with renal disease. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS & MEASUREMENTS: Urine samples from HIV-infected children with biopsy proven HIV-nephropathy (HIVAN; n = 4), HIV-associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HIV-HUS; n = 2), or no renal disease (n = 3) were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and proteomic methods.

Author(s): 
Soler-García, Angel A.
Johnson, Douglas
Hathout, Yetrib
Ray, Patricio E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Women's Health (2002)

OBJECTIVE: Centralized adiposity, insulin resistance, excess iron, and elevated oxidative stress place postmenopausal women at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective of this study was to determine the relationship among excess iron, oxidative stress, and centralized fat mass in healthy postmenopausal women. METHODS: The parent project recruited healthy women for a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial designed to examine the effect of soy isoflavones on bone.

Author(s): 
Crist, Betsy L.
Alekel, D. Lee
Ritland, Laura M.
Hanson, Laura N.
Genschel, Ulrike
Reddy, Manju B.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated that several mineral products sold for medicinal purposes demonstrate antimicrobial activity, but little is known about the physicochemical properties involved in antibacterial activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using in vitro mineral suspension testing, we have identified two natural mineral mixtures, arbitrarily designated BY07 and CB07, with antibacterial activity against a broad-spectrum of bacterial pathogens.

Author(s): 
Cunningham, Tanya M.
Koehl, Jennifer L.
Summers, Jack S.
Haydel, Shelley E.
Publication Title: 
Chemical Communications (Cambridge, England)

A profluorescent probe that has no fluorescent response to H(2)O(2), iron or copper ions but can be readily activated in the presence of both H(2)O(2) and Fe (or Cu) ion has been developed; the probe is capable of detecting oxidative stress promoted by Fe (or Cu) and H(2)O(2) (i.e. the Fenton reaction conditions) in living cells.

Author(s): 
Wei, Yibin
Zhang, Yi
Liu, Zhiwei
Guo, Maolin
Publication Title: 
Experimental Biology and Medicine (Maywood, N.J.)

Vascular inflammation and monocyte recruitment are initiating events in atherosclerosis that have been suggested to be caused, in part, by iron-mediated oxidative stress and shifts in the intracellular redox environment of vascular cells. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate whether the intracellular iron chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO), reduces inflammation and atherosclerosis in experimental mice.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Wei-Jian
Wei, Hao
Frei, Balz
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are central mechanisms underlying the aging process and the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. Selected antioxidants and specific combinations of nutritional compounds could target many biochemical pathways that affect both oxidative stress and mitochondrial function and, thereby, preserve or enhance physical performance.

Author(s): 
Xu, Jinze
Seo, Arnold Y.
Vorobyeva, Darya A.
Carter, Christy S.
Anton, Stephen D.
Lezza, Angela M. S.
Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan
Publication Title: 
Molecular Pharmacology

HIV-1 transcription is activated by HIV-1 Tat protein, which recruits cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9)/cyclin T1 and other host transcriptional coactivators to the HIV-1 promoter. Tat itself is phosphorylated by CDK2, and inhibition of CDK2 by small interfering RNA, the iron chelator 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311), and the iron chelator deferasirox (ICL670) inhibits HIV-1 transcription.

Author(s): 
Debebe, Zufan
Ammosova, Tatyana
Breuer, Denitra
Lovejoy, David B.
Kalinowski, Danuta S.
Kumar, Krishna
Jerebtsova, Marina
Ray, Patricio
Kashanchi, Fatah
Gordeuk, Victor R.
Richardson, Des R.
Nekhai, Sergei

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Iron