Jungian Theory

Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic

Human self-awareness is not easily reducible to known principles of neurochemistry, neurophysiology, or neuropsychology. The author encourages a broader, less restrictive exploration of the nature of self-awareness as it relates to brain-injured patients. He elucidates the role of symbols in neuropsychological rehabilitation and suggests that work, love, and play are the primary symbols of normality that can reconcile brain-injured patients to their neurological condition.

Author(s): 
Prigatano, G. P.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Analytical Psychology

This article responds both sympathetically and critically to some feminist writing about the psychology of women and of gender differences. Through love and the will to power often oppose one another, as Jung maintained, to understand their bearing upon gender it is sometimes important to regard other kinds of relations between them. There is something to be said for imagining the self as being born married.

Author(s): 
Willeford, W.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care

Lullabies and laments promote new awareness, enculturation, adaptation, and grief expression. These concepts' relevance to palliative care, however, has not been examined. In this study, a music therapist used a grounded theory-informed design to reflexively analyze lullaby and lament qualities, evident in more than 20 years of personal palliative care practice. Thus, the construct "lullament" emerged, which signified helpful moments when patients' and families' personal and sociohistorical relationship with lullabies and laments were actualized.

Author(s): 
O'Callaghan, Clare
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Analytical Psychology

Much of Jung's later work assumes that the self is an a priori phenomenon in which centripetal dynamics dominate. There is, however, another current in Jung's writings which recognizes the self to be an emergent phenomenon. This view is increasingly prevalent in post-Jungian discourse, and Louis Zinkin's exploration of a post-Jungian-constructivist model of the self can be seen as part of this tendency.

Author(s): 
Austin, Sue
Publication Title: 
Issues in Mental Health Nursing

Last year, when reading Freud's letters to Jung, I came across a most interesting passage in which Freud claimed that the "talking cure" (i.e., psychoanalysis) was the result of love--not transference, counter-transference, or another neologism of psychiatry. That is, Freud said to Jung, the cure in psychoanalysis is affected by love (McGuire, 1974 ).

Author(s): 
Koprowski, Eugene J.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Analytical Psychology

The experience of the Jungian analyst in the role of editor of manuscripts by creative colleagues is examined. Historical precedents include Michael Fordham's editorial correspondence with Jung around the latter's synchronicity essay; Jung's handling of manuscripts submitted by Sabina Spielrein to the Jahrbuch f¸r psychoanalytische und psychopathologische Forschungen and various authors to the Zentralblatt f¸r Psychotherapie und ihre Grenzgebiete, and the author's close editing of a paper submitted by Andrew Samuels to the Journal of Analytical Psychology.

Author(s): 
Beebe, John
Publication Title: 
Schweizerische Medizinische Wochenschrift

The concept of "the unconscious" is considered the central concept of depth psychology. While the unconscious in Freud's conception consists essentially of repressed material and through conversion can result in psychosomatic illnesses, C. G. Jung saw in the "collective unconscious", which he discovered, the source of all psychic and spiritual development. Mediation between the collective unconscious and the conscious is effected by means of the "archetypes", whose function can be compared with the instincts.

Author(s): 
Barz, H.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Inquiry

Timely change is in the air as interest grows in the riches of nursing literature and other creative arts of nursing. Using Jungian and sociological concepts, this article takes a personal look at the literature's contribution to the profession. As the image of contemporary nursing is redefined, the power of the creative is evident, both in its grounding effect on individual practice and its unifying and strengthening potential for a changing profession.

Author(s): 
Richmond, J.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Hall, J. A.
Publication Title: 
Adolescence

This paper explores Jungian feminine psychology and its application in the treatment of adolescent prostitutes. Wolff's (1956) work on feminine functions and Leonard's (1982) work with father-daughter wounds are discussed, and techniques for applying these concepts with adolescent prostitutes are explored.

Author(s): 
Newton-Ruddy, L.
Handelsman, M. M.

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