Kinesthesis

Publication Title: 
Perceptual and Motor Skills
Author(s): 
Yensen, R.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Edmonston, W. E.
Marks, H. E.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

Previous research suggests that conversion disordered patients with hand/arm paralysis exhibit slowed reaction times for mental hand-rotation tasks that correspond to their affected arm when the tasks are explicitly instructed and not when they are implicitly cued. Because of the many similarities between hypnotic phenomena and conversion symptoms, the authors tested whether similar motor imagery impairment would occur among normal high hypnotizable subjects when paralysis is suggested.

Author(s): 
Roelofs, Karin
Hoogduin, Kees A. L.
Keijsers, Ger P. J.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

In this study, participants who failed to exhibit pendulum movement in response to Chevreul's Pendulum (CP) instructions had lower Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form A (SHSS:A) scores and reported experiencing less subjective response to hypnosis than did their counterparts who exhibited CP movement. However, intensity scores on Shor's Personal Experiences Questionnaire (PEQ) did not differ between pass- and fail-CP groups.

Author(s): 
Karlin, Robert A.
Hill, Austin
Messer, Stanley
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

How many persons need tactile support à la Milton H. Erickson to achieve arm levitation during hypnosis? How do these differ from those who do not need it? Hypnotic arm levitation was suggested three times consecutively to 30 medium suggestible students. Sixteen succeeded without any tactile support; 7 needed it one or two times; 5 needed it every time; and 2 achieved no arm levitation at all. Participants without any tactile support went more quickly into deeper hypnosis, experienced more involuntariness, less effort, and had higher electrodermal activity.

Author(s): 
Peter, Burkhard
Piesbergen, Christoph
Lucic, Kristina
Staudacher, Melina
Hagl, Maria
Publication Title: 
Pflege Zeitschrift
Author(s): 
Christen, Lisanne
Brunner, Anouk
Oehninger, Ruth
Publication Title: 
Bone

Preterm delivery (<37 weeks post-menstrual age) is associated with suboptimal bone mass. We hypothesized that tactile/kinesthetic stimulation (TKS), a form of infant massage that incorporates kinesthetic movement, would increase bone strength and markers of bone accretion in preterm infants. Preterm, AGA infants (29-32 weeks) were randomly assigned to TKS (N=20) or Control (N=20). Twice daily TKS was provided 6 days per week for 2 weeks. Control infants received the same care without TKS treatment. Treatment was masked to parents, health care providers, and study personnel.

Author(s): 
Haley, S.
Beachy, J.
Ivaska, K. K.
Slater, H.
Smith, S.
Moyer-Mileur, L. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Musculoskeletal & Neuronal Interactions

OBJECTIVES: Preterm infants are born with low bone mineral. Neonatal stress further impedes bone mineralization. Clinical evidence suggests that tactile and kinesthetic stimulation (TKS) improves bone phenotype and decreases stress response. Clinical and translational studies indicate the IGF-1 axis, responsible for postnatal growth and bone mineralization, is a key player. We hypothesized that TKS would attenuate the negative impact of neonatal stress on bone phenotype and the IGF-1 axis in weanling rats.

Author(s): 
Haley, S.
Gulliver, K.
Baldassarre, R.
Miller, S.
Lane, R. H.
Moyer-Mileur, L. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of massage with or without kinesthetic stimulation on weight gain and length of hospital stay in the preterm infant. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted evaluating the effects of massage with or without kinesthetic stimulation (KS) on weight gain and length of stay (LOS) in medically stable premature (<1500 g and/or <or=32 weeks gestational age) neonates. Infants were randomized either to receive no intervention (control), massage therapy alone (massage), or massage therapy with KS (M/KS).

Author(s): 
Massaro, A. N.
Hammad, T. A.
Jazzo, B.
Aly, H.
Publication Title: 
Soins. Gérontologie
Author(s): 
Croci, Lionel

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