Knee Joint

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

Ambulatory knee surgery is a common procedure with over 100,000 knee arthroscopies performed in the U.K. in 2010-2011. Pain after surgery can decrease patient satisfaction, delay discharge, and decrease cost effectiveness. Multi-modal therapies, including complementary therapies, to improve pain control after surgery have been recommended. However, a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the use of complementary therapies to enhance pain control after ambulatory knee surgery is lacking, and this article aims to address this deficit.

Author(s): 
Barlow, Timothy
Downham, Christopher
Barlow, David
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

PURPOSE: To review the efficacy of nonmedicinal, noninvasive therapies in hip and knee osteoarthritis. DATA SOURCES: Search of English-language literature from 1966 through 1993 using MEDLINE by cross-referencing "osteoarthritis" (therapy subheadings) with "controlled trial," "comparative study," or "trial(s)." STUDY SELECTION: Fifteen controlled trials of diathermy (deep heat), exercise, acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, topically applied capsaicin, low-energy laser, and pulsed electromagnetic fields were found.

Author(s): 
Puett, D. W.
Griffin, M. R.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine

OBJECTIVE: Physical interventions (nonpharmacological and nonsurgical) are the mainstay of treatment for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Physiotherapy is the most common of all physical interventions and includes specific vastus medialis obliquus or general quadriceps strengthening and/or realignment procedures (tape, brace, stretching). These treatments appear to be based on sound theoretical rationale and have attained widespread acceptance, but evidence for the efficacy of these interventions is not well established.

Author(s): 
Crossley, K.
Bennell, K.
Green, S.
McConnell, J.
Publication Title: 
Atencion Primaria

AIM: To determine the effectiveness of acupuncture in controlling pain from arthritis of the knee. DESIGN: Systematic review. DATA SOURCES: MedLine, the Cochrane Library. STUDY SELECTION: Of the 9 studies located, only 4 met the inclusion criteria. All were controlled, randomized clinical trials that studied the effect of acupuncture only in the knee joint. DATA EXTRACTION: Primary outcome variables were intensity of pain, overall measure (general improvement, proportion of patients who recovered, subjective improvement in symptoms) and functional status.

Author(s): 
Ferrández Infante, A.
García Olmos, L.
González Gamarra, A.
Meis Meis, M. J.
Sánchez Rodríguez, B. M.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review of the literature. OBJECTIVES: To develop a grading scale to judge the quality of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and conduct a systematic review of the published RCTs that assess nonoperative treatments for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). BACKGROUND: Systematic reviews of the quality and usefulness of clinical trials allow for efficient synthesis and dissemination of the literature, which should facilitate clinicians' efforts to incorporate principles of evidence-based practice in the clinical decision-making process.

Author(s): 
Bizzini, Mario
Childs, John D.
Piva, Sara R.
DeLitto, Anthony
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Osteoarthritis of the knee affects about 10% of adults aged over 60 years, with risk increased in those with obesity, and joint damage or abnormalities. Progression of disease on x rays is commonplace, but x ray changes don't correlate well with clinical symptoms. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-surgical treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee? What are the effects of surgical treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee?

Author(s): 
Scott, David
Kowalczyk, Anna
Publication Title: 
Sports Medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)

Anterior knee pain is a chronic condition that presents frequently to sports medicine clinics, and can have a long-term impact on participation in physical activity. Conceivably, effective early management may prevent chronicity and facilitate physical activity. Although a variety of nonsurgical interventions have been advocated, previous systematic reviews have consistently been unable to reach conclusions to support their use.

Author(s): 
Collins, Natalie J.
Bisset, Leanne M.
Crossley, Kay M.
Vicenzino, Bill
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

Ambulatory knee surgery is a common procedure with over 100,000 knee arthroscopies performed in the U.K. in 2010-2011. Pain after surgery can decrease patient satisfaction, delay discharge, and decrease cost effectiveness. Multi-modal therapies, including complementary therapies, to improve pain control after surgery have been recommended. However, a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the use of complementary therapies to enhance pain control after ambulatory knee surgery is lacking, and this article aims to address this deficit.

Author(s): 
Barlow, Timothy
Downham, Christopher
Barlow, David
Publication Title: 
Physiotherapy Theory and Practice

BACKGROUND: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability in older adults (?60) in the UK. If nonsurgical management fails and if OA severity becomes too great, knee arthroplasty is a preferred treatment choice. Preoperative physiotherapy is often offered as part of rehabilitation to improve postoperative patient-based outcomes. OBJECTIVES: Systematically review whether preoperative physiotherapy improves postoperative, patient-based outcomes in older adults who have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare study interventions to best-practice guidelines.

Author(s): 
Chesham, Ross Alexander
Shanmugam, Sivaramkumar
Publication Title: 
Arthritis and Rheumatism

OBJECTIVE: Chebulagic acid (CHE) from the immature seeds of Terminalia chebula was identified from a natural product library as a potent suppressor of T cell activity. This study examined the effectiveness of CHE against the onset and progression of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. METHODS: Arthritis was induced in DBA/1J mice by subcutaneous immunization with bovine type II collagen on days 0 and 21. CHE was administered intraperitoneally for 3 weeks, either as prophylaxis (10 or 20 mg/kg) before disease onset or as therapy (20 mg/kg) after disease onset.

Author(s): 
Lee, Sang-Ik
Hyun, Pung-Mi
Kim, Seung-Hyung
Kim, Kyoung-Shin
Lee, Sang-Keun
Kim, Byoung-Soo
Maeng, Pil Jae
Lim, Jong-Soon

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