Lasers

Publication Title: 
Rheumatology (Oxford, England)

OBJECTIVE: To establish whether there is evidence for or against the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of neck pain. METHODS: A systematic literature review was undertaken of studies that compared needle or laser acupuncture with a control procedure for the treatment of neck pain. Two reviewers independently extracted data concerning study methods, quality and outcome. RESULTS: Overall, the outcomes of 14 randomized controlled trials were equally balanced between positive and negative.

Author(s): 
White, A. R.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVES: Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are important aspects of musculoskeletal medicine, including chiropractic. The purpose of this study was to review the most commonly used treatment procedures in chiropractic for MPS and MTrPs. METHODS: The Scientific Commission of the Council on Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters (CCGPP) was charged with developing literature syntheses, organized by anatomical region, to evaluate and report on the evidence base for chiropractic care. This article is the outcome of this charge.

Author(s): 
Vernon, Howard
Schneider, Michael
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: Chronic tendon pathology is a soft tissue condition commonly seen in chiropractic practice. Tendonitis, tendinosis, and tendinopathy are terms used to describe this clinical entity. The purpose of this article is to review interventions commonly used by doctors of chiropractic when treating tendinopathy. METHODS: The Scientific Commission of the Council on Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters (CCGPP) was charged with developing literature syntheses, organized by anatomical region, to evaluate and report on the evidence base for chiropractic care.

Author(s): 
Pfefer, Mark T.
Cooper, Stephan R.
Uhl, Nathan L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVES: Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are important aspects of musculoskeletal medicine, including chiropractic. The purpose of this study was to review the most commonly used treatment procedures in chiropractic for MPS and MTrPs. METHODS: The Scientific Commission of the Council on Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters (CCGPP) was charged with developing literature syntheses, organized by anatomical region, to evaluate and report on the evidence base for chiropractic care. This article is the outcome of this charge.

Author(s): 
Vernon, Howard
Schneider, Michael
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: Chronic tendon pathology is a soft tissue condition commonly seen in chiropractic practice. Tendonitis, tendinosis, and tendinopathy are terms used to describe this clinical entity. The purpose of this article is to review interventions commonly used by doctors of chiropractic when treating tendinopathy. METHODS: The Scientific Commission of the Council on Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters (CCGPP) was charged with developing literature syntheses, organized by anatomical region, to evaluate and report on the evidence base for chiropractic care.

Author(s): 
Pfefer, Mark T.
Cooper, Stephan R.
Uhl, Nathan L.
Publication Title: 
Singapore Medical Journal

INTRODUCTION: Plantar fasciitis is a commonly seen outpatient condition that has numerous treatment modalities of varying degrees of efficacy. This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture in reducing pain caused by plantar fasciitis. METHODS: Online literature searches were performed on the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases for studies on the use of acupuncture for pain caused by plantar fasciitis. Studies designed as randomised controlled trials and that compared acupuncture with standard treatments or had real versus sham acupuncture arms were selected.

Author(s): 
Thiagarajah, Anandan Gerard
Publication Title: 
Archives of Dermatological Research

The effect of psychological pain reduction on the cutaneous inflammatory process was investigated by studying the effect of hypnotically induced analgesia on the flare reaction of cutaneous histamine prick tests. Ten highly hypnotically susceptible volunteers had their cutaneous reactivity against histamine prick tests on both arms measured before hypnosis. Their pain-related brain potentials were measured on the basis of eight argon laser stimulations. These measurements were repeated in the hypnotic condition, where subjects were given repeated suggestions of analgesia in one arm.

Author(s): 
Zachariae, R.
Bjerring, P.
Publication Title: 
Pain

The ability to reduce both clinically and experimentally induced pain by hypnotic suggestion of analgesia is well known. However, the nature of hypnotic analgesia still remains uncertain. Attempts to demonstrate and identify specific psychophysiological mechanisms have, so far, been unsatisfactory. Methodological problems in inducing pain and monitoring physiological responses may be the reason for this lack of success. In the present study, we have attempted to eliminate some of these methodological problems.

Author(s): 
Arendt-Nielsen, L.
Zachariae, R.
Bjerring, P.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

Pain reports and amplitudes of painful argon laser-induced brain potentials were obtained for 10 high and 10 low hypnotizable volunteers following placebo and a randomized sequence of four hypnotically induced conditions of (a) neutral hypnosis, (b) deep relaxation, (c) pleasant dissociated "out of body" imagery, and (d) focused analgesia of the hand. Both high and low hypnotizable subjects exhibited significant reductions of reported pain during conditions of neutral hypnosis, relaxation, dissociated imagery, and focused analgesia.

Author(s): 
Zachariae, R.
Bjerring, P.
Publication Title: 
Revue Neurologique

The study of pain integration, in vivo, within the human brain has been largely improved by the functional neuro-imaging techniques available for about 10 years. Positron Emission Tomography (PET), complemented by laser evoked potentials (LEP) and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) can nowadays generate maps of physiological or neuropathic pain-related brain activity. LEP and fMRI complement PET by their better temporal resolution and the possibility of individual subject analyze.

Author(s): 
Laurent, B.
Peyron, R.
Garcia Larrea, L.
Mauguière, F.

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