Licensure

Publication Title: 
Forschende Komplementarmedizin (2006)

BACKGROUND: The demand for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment in the European Union (EU) has led to an increase in the various CAM interventions available to the public. Our aim was to describe the CAM services available from both registered medical practitioners and registered non-medical practitioners.

Author(s): 
von Ammon, Klaus
Frei-Erb, Martin
Cardini, Francesco
Daig, Ute
Dragan, Simona
Hegyi, Gabriella
Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo
Sörensen, Jan
Lewith, George
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Traditionally, acupuncture is embedded in naturalistic theories that are compatible with Confucianism and Taoism. Such ideas as yin-yang, qi, dampness, and wind represent East Asian conceptual frameworks that emphasize the reliability of ordinary, human sensory awareness. Many physicians who practice acupuncture reject such prescientific notions. Numerous randomized, controlled trials and more than 25 systematic reviews and meta-analyses have evaluated the clinical efficacy of acupuncture.

Author(s): 
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

This paper highlights the emergence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) within New Zealand. The historical path of development and acceptance of CAM from 1908 will be outlined, with reference to the development of current legislation and government policy. Emphasis will be placed on rapid changes occurring over the last decade. Acupuncture, osteopathy, chiropractics and therapeutic massage are presented as examples of CAM development and practice within New Zealand. Appendix A represents those modalities currently practiced in New Zealand.

Author(s): 
Duke, Kate
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Rodolfa, E.
Kraft, W. A.
Reilley, R. R.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Increasingly around the world as clinicians and researchers alike become more sophisticated in their understanding of the hypnotic process, there is developing a conviction that the hypnotic state or process itself poses no inherent dangers for patients but that its inexpert use may. The solution to prevent potential patient harm is to ensure that all clinicians of whatever discipline have adequate and appropriate clinical training prior to being allowed to practice.

Author(s): 
Stanley, R. O.
Rose, L.
Burrows, G. D.
Publication Title: 
Dermatology Nursing / Dermatology Nurses' Association
Author(s): 
Shenefelt, Philip D.
Publication Title: 
The Hospital Medical Staff
Author(s): 
Noie, N.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Yoga Therapy

The following is a transcript of a talk given by Wynn Werner, who is a board member of the National Ayurvedic Medical Association (NAMA) and member of the NAMA standards committee, at the NAMA conference in April 2010. In this talk, Werner discusses the legal and licensing challenges facing Ayurvedic practitioners in the United States. IAYT finds the work of NAMA on the issue of professional development to be both educational and thought-provoking for our own field's parallel process. We present this transcript to contribute to the conversation within the yoga therapy community.

Author(s): 
Werner, Wynn
Publication Title: 
Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband Der Ärzte Des Öffentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany))

In Germany two professional groups may apply medical science to human beings: physicians and "Heilpraktiker" (naturopaths). However, no regulations exist regarding training, examination and continuation of studies of "Heilpraktiker". They only have to be checked on the basis of the Heilpraktiker low intended to exclude a danger to health of the people. In North Rhine Westphalia each of the 54 public health offices effects this checking on its own responsibility.

Author(s): 
Lubbe, R.
Publication Title: 
Medical Anthropology Quarterly

Naturopathic medicine in the United States had its inception around the turn of the 20th century. Subsequently, it underwent a process of relatively rapid growth until around the 1930s, followed by a period of gradual decline almost to the point of extinction due to biomedical opposition and the advent of "miracle drugs." Because its therapeutic eclecticism had preadapted it to fit into the holistic health movement that emerged in the 1970s, it was able to undergo a process of organizational rejuvenation during the last two decades of the century. Nevertheless, U.S.

Author(s): 
Baer, H. A.

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