Life Support Care

Publication Title: 
Pediatric Emergency Care

OBJECTIVE: The study's objective was to report a case and review the literature on the use of extracorporeal life support in the face of severe pulmonary hemorrhage for acute respiratory distress syndrome. STUDY SELECTION: This study is a single case report of a pediatric patient who was successfully managed on venovenous extracorporeal life support for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome with acute pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to Wegener disease.

Author(s): 
Joseph, Mark
Charles, Anthony G.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

The success of science and medical technology has led to medical brinkmanship, pushing aggressive treatment as far as it can go. But medicine lacks the precision necessary for such brinkmanship to succeed, and the resulting cycle of expectation and disappointment in technology has, in part, led to an increasing acceptance of euthanasia and assisted suicide, linked closely with advocacy for patient autonomy. At the opposite extreme lies medical vitalism, which refers to attempts to preserve the patient's life in and of itself without any significant hope for recovery.

Author(s): 
Nairn, T. A.
Publication Title: 
Stanford Law Review

In this note, Katherine A. White explores the conflict between religious health care providers who provide care in accordance with their religious beliefs and the patients who want access to medical care that these religious providers find objectionable. Specifically, she examines Roman Catholic health care institutions and HMOs that follow the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services and considers other religious providers with similar beliefs.

Author(s): 
White, K. A.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

The author comments on the consensus statement from the point of view of an ethics consultant in Germany. Since many hospitals in Germany are under considerable competitive pressure, mission statements are becoming more and more important in order to draw a distinction between the different hospital types and to convey the meaning of the corporate identity both internally and externally. The Consensus Statement, which provides basic orientation without going into too much detail, can be a helpful initial document.

Author(s): 
Schmidt, K. W.
Publication Title: 
NeuroRehabilitation

The topic of therapeutic proportionality represents one of the main emerging issues in the contemporary bioethical debate. This paper intends to outline the development of moral doctrine on the use of therapeutic means.

Author(s): 
Calipari, Maurizio
Publication Title: 
Issues in Law & Medicine

On March 20, 2004, Pope John Paul II issued a statement to the International Conference on "Life Sustaining Treatments and Vegetative State: Scientific and Ethical Dilemmas" on the provision of food and water to patients in a "vegetative state." The purpose of this allocution was to promote and protect the dignity of patients, even when they are in a seriously ill and disabled state. To promote the dignity of these patients, the Pope explicitly stated that "quality of life judgments" were not to be applied to the administration of nutrition and fluids.

Author(s): 
Barry, Robert
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This article discusses the unexpectedly firm stance professed by John Paul II on the provision of artificial nutrition and hydration to patients who are in a persistent vegetative state, and it implications on previously held standards of judging medical treatments. The traditional ordinary/extraordinary care distinction is assessed in light of complexities of the recent allocution as well as its impact on Catholic individuals and in Catholic health care facilities.

Author(s): 
Shannon, Thomas A.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This essay reviews the Roman Catholic moral tradition surrounding treatments at the end of life together with the challenges presented to that tradition by the Texas Advance Directives Act. The impact on Catholic health care facilities and physicians, and the way in which the moral tradition should be applied under this statute, particularly with reference to the provision dealing with conflicts over end-of-life treatments, will be critically assessed.

Author(s): 
Zientek, David M.
Publication Title: 
HEC forum: an interdisciplinary journal on hospitals' ethical and legal issues

Roman Catholics have a long tradition of evaluating medical treatment at the end of life to determine if proposed interventions are proportionate and morally obligatory or disproportionate and morally optional. There has been significant debate within the Catholic community about whether artificially delivered nutrition and hydration can be appreciated as a medical intervention that may be optional in some situations, or if it should be treated as essentially obligatory in all circumstances.

Author(s): 
Zientek, David M.
Publication Title: 
Hospital Progress

Advanced medical technology has complicated moral decisions affecting health care by increasing costs and by holding out heroic measures that may be contrary to an individual's self-actualization. Bioethics guides the family, society's principal institution for nurturing, as it grapples with issues of life generation, prolongation, and termination.

Author(s): 
Moraczewski, A. S.

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