Lordosis

Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

Cervical curve depth (CCD) was radiographically evaluated in 35 patients who presented with cervical hypolordosis or kyphosis (CH/K). Of these, one group of 20 patients received chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) for the purpose of correcting the disorder. A second group of nine patients received both CMT and an orthopedic cervical pillow for in home correction of the CH/K. A control group of six patients received CMT which was not intended to correct the CH/K. The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of CMT in the correction of CH/K.

Author(s): 
Leach, R. A.
Publication Title: 
Spine

Ninety-nine anteroposterior and lateral lumbar radiographs taken of men, 18 to 55 years of age, were randomly selected from participants in a population survey of low-back pain. Thirty-one (31%) had never had low-back pain; 44 (44%) had or were having mild low-back pain; and 24 (24%) had or were having severe low-back pain. Three chiropractors assessed 56 radiographic variables, which included determinations of disc space height, vertebral malalignments and subluxations, spondylosis, postural disturbances, relationships among pelvis and spine and other congenital or acquired abnormalities.

Author(s): 
Frymoyer, J. W.
Phillips, R. B.
Newberg, A. H.
MacPherson, B. V.
Publication Title: 
Laryngologie, Rhinologie, Otologie

Functional disorders of the cervical spine may lead to vertigenous symptoms. The typical pathological finding in these patients is a hyperlordotic position of the cervical spine. This causes functional problems of the C0/C1 and C1/C2 joints. X-rays show morphological changes of the vertebrae and may also point to functional disorders. Physiotherapy is the most important treatment modality and preventative measure in static dysbalance of the cervical spine. sometimes chiropractic therapy by an experienced manual therapist or carefully directed infiltration therapy is necessary.

Author(s): 
Biesinger, E.
Publication Title: 
Zeitschrift Für Orthopädie Und Ihre Grenzgebiete

Owing to joint mechanics, movement of the atlas alone, as envisioned in HIO diagnosis for producing a superior or inferior position, is not possible when the tranverse ligament is intact, since an atlas movement of this kind would necessitate a change in the statics of the dens amounting to kyphosis or lordosis. Only in the superior or inferior position, as defined by Decking and ter Steege, is there a true malposition of the atlas as a result of atlas movement, and this is only possible if the dens assumes a lordotic or kyphotic position.

Author(s): 
Kamieth, H.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

An investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of chiropractic adjustments on static radiological parameters. Standard plain film radiography was used. A retrospective consecutive case analysis approach was used for obtaining the data from the pretreatment and comparative posttreatment radiographs. Measurements for cervical lordosis, sacral base angle, lumbar lordosis, scapular angle, Cobb's angle and retrolisthesis of adjusted lumbar segments were determined by marking films in a blinded fashion.

Author(s): 
Plaugher, G.
Cremata, E. E.
Phillips, R. B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: To experimentally investigate the effect of cervical extension-compression traction combined with diversified chiropractic manipulation and drop table adjusting in establishing or increasing cervical lordosis. DESIGN: Blinded, before and after trial with pre- and postlateral cervical radiographic measurement. SETTING: Primary care private chiropractic clinic in Saugus, MA. SUBJECTS: A) Control group--convenience sample who had no health care for 10-14 wk, 30 persons.

Author(s): 
Harrison, D. D.
Jackson, B. L.
Troyanovich, S.
Robertson, G.
de George, D.
Barker, W. F.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the accuracy of anatomical assumptions made to derive a geometrical, ideal, normal model of the upright, static, sagittal cervical spine, to make comparisons with other spinal models and to discuss the implications of a normal cervical model. BACKGROUND: Anatomical assumptions were made based on observations to assist in the development of a computerized geometrical model of the ideal upright, static, sagittal cervical spine.

Author(s): 
Harrison, D. D.
Janik, T. J.
Troyanovich, S. J.
Harrison, D. E.
Colloca, C. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the choice of either the superior or inferior endplate of the L1 vertebra as the proximal landmark for the measurement of lumbar lordosis could significantly affect the categorization (i.e., hypo- or hyperlordotic or normal) of that lordosis in subjects where the L1 vertebra is wedged anteriorly. DESIGN: Concurrent validity. SETTING: The Anglo-European College of Chiropractic teaching clinic. SELECTION: A total of 260 files were screened from new patient files at the clinic dating from the year 1980 onward.

Author(s): 
Worrill, N. A.
Peterson, C. K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the reliability of a specific method of radiographic analysis of the geometric configuration of the lumbopelvic spine in the sagittal plane, and to investigate the concurrent validity of a computer-aided digitization procedure designed to replace the more tedious and time-consuming manual measurement process. DESIGN: A blind, repeated-measures design was used. The results of radiographic measures derived through the traditional manual marking method were compared with measures derived by computer-aided digitization of lateral lumbopelvic radiographs.

Author(s): 
Troyanovich, S. J.
Harrison, D. E.
Harrison, D. D.
Holland, B.
Janik, T. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

BACKGROUND: Cervical lordosis is often used as an indicator for a number of clinical conditions ranging from traumatic to degenerative. Previous research has indicated that a number of factors may change the lordosis. However, the link between hyperplastic articular pillars and cervical lordosis measurements has never been studied. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the reliability of determining articular pillar hyperplasia, to determine its prevalence, and to compare lordosis measurements between persons with and without hyperplasia of the cervical articular pillars.

Author(s): 
Peterson, C. K.
Kirk, R. J.
Isdahl, M.
Humphrey, B. K.

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