loving-kindness

Publication Title: 
Frontiers in Psychology

While it has been suggested that loving-kindness meditation (LKM) is an effective practice for promoting positive emotions, the empirical evidence in the literature remains unclear. Here, we provide a systematic review of 24 empirical studies (N = 1759) on LKM with self-reported positive emotions. The effect of LKM on positive emotions was estimated with meta-analysis, and the influence of variations across LKM interventions was further explored with subgroup analysis and meta-regression.

Author(s): 
Zeng, Xianglong
Chiu, Cleo P. K.
Wang, Rong
Oei, Tian P. S.
Leung, Freedom Y. K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

This article introduces the issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session entitled "Beyond Meditation: Mindfulness-Related Clinical Practices." In the article, I describe how the "sisters of mindfulness"-forgiveness, gratitude, loving-kindness, compassion, acceptance, and best-self visualization-are each interconnected and important forms of mindfulness as well as tenets of Buddhist psychology. Each of these practices reflect mental strengths that are being integrated into the brain's neuroplastic development as a function of modern day psychotherapy.

Author(s): 
Rosenzweig, Debra
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

This article introduces the issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session entitled "Beyond Meditation: Mindfulness-Related Clinical Practices." In the article, I describe how the "sisters of mindfulness"-forgiveness, gratitude, loving-kindness, compassion, acceptance, and best-self visualization-are each interconnected and important forms of mindfulness as well as tenets of Buddhist psychology. Each of these practices reflect mental strengths that are being integrated into the brain's neuroplastic development as a function of modern day psychotherapy.

Author(s): 
Rosenzweig, Debra
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

The healing process of the Best Self Visualization Method (BSM) is described within the framework of meditation, neuroscience, and psychodynamic theory. Cases are drawn from the treatment of high-risk youth, who have histories of poverty, survival of sexual and physical abuse, and/or current risk for perpetrating abuse. Clinical use of BSM is demonstrated in two case illustrations, one of group psychotherapy and another of individual therapy.

Author(s): 
Schussel, Lorne
Miller, Lisa
Publication Title: 
Frontiers in Psychology

While it has been suggested that loving-kindness meditation (LKM) is an effective practice for promoting positive emotions, the empirical evidence in the literature remains unclear. Here, we provide a systematic review of 24 empirical studies (N = 1759) on LKM with self-reported positive emotions. The effect of LKM on positive emotions was estimated with meta-analysis, and the influence of variations across LKM interventions was further explored with subgroup analysis and meta-regression.

Author(s): 
Zeng, Xianglong
Chiu, Cleo P. K.
Wang, Rong
Oei, Tian P. S.
Leung, Freedom Y. K.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy

The aim of this randomized pilot study is to investigate the effects of a short training programme in loving-kindness and compassion meditation (LKM/CM) in patients with borderline personality disorder. Patients were allocated to LKM/CM or mindfulness continuation training (control group). Patients in the LKM/CM group showed greater changes in Acceptance compared with the control group. Remarkable changes in borderline symptomatology, self-criticism and self-kindness were also observed in the LKM/CM group. Mechanistic explanations and therapeutic implications of the findings are discussed.

Author(s): 
Feliu-Soler, Albert
Pascual, Juan Carlos
Elices, Matilde
MartÌn-Blanco, Ana
Carmona, Cristina
Cebolla, Ausi‡s
SimÛn, Vicente
Soler, Joaquim
Publication Title: 
Frontiers in Psychology

Research in social neuroscience provides increasing evidence that self and other are interconnected, both on a conceptual and on an affective representational level. Moreover, the ability to recognize the other as "like the self" is thought to be essential for social phenomena like empathy and compassion. Meditation practices such as loving-kindness meditation (LKM) have been found to enhance these capacities. Therefore, we investigated whether LKM is associated to an increased integration of self-other-representations.

Author(s): 
Trautwein, Fynn-Mathis
Naranjo, JosÈ R.
Schmidt, Stefan
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