Low Back Pain

Publication Title: 
Applied Health Economics and Health Policy

BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem, having a substantial effect on peoples' quality of life and placing a significant economic burden on healthcare systems and, more broadly, societies. Many interventions to alleviate LBP are available but their cost effectiveness is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To identify, document and appraise studies reporting on the cost effectiveness of non-invasive and non-pharmacological treatment options for LBP.

Author(s): 
Andronis, Lazaros
Kinghorn, Philip
Qiao, Suyin
Whitehurst, David G. T.
Durrell, Susie
McLeod, Hugh
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Background: A 2007 American College of Physicians guideline addressed nonpharmacologic treatment options for low back pain. New evidence is now available. Purpose: To systematically review the current evidence on nonpharmacologic therapies for acute or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. Data Sources: Ovid MEDLINE (January 2008 through February 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Chou, Roger
Deyo, Richard
Friedly, Janna
Skelly, Andrea
Hashimoto, Robin
Weimer, Melissa
Fu, Rochelle
Dana, Tracy
Kraegel, Paul
Griffin, Jessica
Grusing, Sara
Brodt, Erika D.
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

OBJECTIVE: This manuscript reviews peer-reviewed literature published from 2010-2012 relevant to the management of chronic pain in the primary care setting. DESIGN: Narrative review of peer-reviewed literature. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, and reference lists and queried expert contacts for English-language studies related to the management of chronic noncancer pain in adult patients in primary care settings.

Author(s): 
Frank, Joseph W.
Bair, Matthew J.
Becker, William C.
Krebs, Erin E.
Liebschutz, Jane M.
Alford, Daniel P.
Publication Title: 
The Spine Journal: Official Journal of the North American Spine Society

BACKGROUND: Seven previous systematic reviews (SRs) have evaluated back schools, and one has evaluated brief education, with the latest SR including studies until November 2004. The effectiveness of fear-avoidance training has not been assessed. PURPOSE: To assess the effectiveness of back schools, brief education, and fear-avoidance training for chronic low back pain (CLBP). STUDY DESIGN: A SR. METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE database of randomized controlled trials (RCT) until August 2006 for relevant trials reported in English.

Author(s): 
Brox, J. I.
Storheim, K.
Grotle, M.
Tveito, T. H.
Indahl, A.
Eriksen, H. R.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Emergency Medicine

BACKGROUND: A total of 2.7 million patients present to US emergency departments annually for management of low back pain (LBP). Despite optimal medical therapy, more than 50% remain functionally impaired 3 months later. We performed a systematic review to address the following question: Among patients with nonchronic LBP, does spinal manipulation, massage, exercise, or yoga, when combined with standard medical therapy, improve pain and functional outcomes more than standard medical therapy alone?

Author(s): 
Rothberg, Samantha
Friedman, Benjamin W.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Description: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on noninvasive treatment of low back pain. Methods: Using the ACP grading system, the committee based these recommendations on a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews published through April 2015 on noninvasive pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments for low back pain. Updated searches were performed through November 2016.

Author(s): 
Qaseem, Amir
Wilt, Timothy J.
McLean, Robert M.
Forciea, Mary Ann
Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians
Publication Title: 
European Spine Journal: Official Publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society

Healthcare costs for low back pain (LBP) are increasing rapidly. Hence, it is important to provide treatments that are effective and cost-effective. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of guideline-endorsed treatments for LBP. We searched nine clinical and economic electronic databases and the reference list of relevant systematic reviews and included studies for eligible studies.

Author(s): 
Lin, Chung-Wei Christine
Haas, Marion
Maher, Chris G.
Machado, Luciana A. C.
van Tulder, Maurits W.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of unloaded movement facilitation exercises on outcomes for people with nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). METHODS: This systematic review was conducted according to Cochrane Back Review Group and Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses (QUORUM) guidelines. Exercise effects were reported as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). RESULTS: Six high-quality randomized controlled trials were included.

Author(s): 
Slade, Susan C.
Keating, Jennifer L.
Publication Title: 
PharmacoEconomics

Lower back pain is one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal conditions in the developed world and accounts for significant health services use.

Author(s): 
Haas, Marion
De Abreu Lourenco, Richard
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Non-specific low back pain is a common, potentially disabling condition usually treated with self-care and non-prescription medication. For chronic low back pain, current guidelines state that exercise therapy may be beneficial. Yoga is a mind-body exercise sometimes used for non-specific low back pain. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of yoga for treating chronic non-specific low back pain, compared to no specific treatment, a minimal intervention (e.g. education), or another active treatment, with a focus on pain, function, and adverse events.

Author(s): 
Wieland, L. Susan
Skoetz, Nicole
Pilkington, Karen
Vempati, Ramaprabhu
D'Adamo, Christopher R.
Berman, Brian M.

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