Lumbosacral Region

Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Low back pain (LBP) affects about 70% of people in resource-rich countries at some point. Acute low back pain is usually perceived as self-limiting; however, one year later, as many as 33% of people still have moderate-intensity pain and 15% have severe pain. It has a high recurrence rate; 75% of those with a first episode have a recurrence. Although acute episodes may resolve completely, they may also increase in severity and duration over time.

Author(s): 
Hall, Hamilton
McIntosh, Greg
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Low back pain (LBP) affects about 70% of people in resource-rich countries at some point. Acute low back pain is usually perceived as self-limiting; however, one year later, as many as 33% of people still have moderate-intensity pain and 15% have severe pain. It has a high recurrence rate; 75% of those with a first episode have a recurrence. Although acute episodes may resolve completely, they may also increase in severity and duration over time.

Author(s): 
Hall, Hamilton
McIntosh, Greg
Publication Title: 
Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine

BACKGROUND: Clinical studies on the efficacy of warm needle moxibustion to treat lumbar disc herniation are increasing, while studies on the assessment of its efficacy are still lacking. OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical effect of warm needle moxibustion on lumbar disc herniation. METHODS: We searched relevant trials that compared warm needle moxibustion with other methods for lumbar disc herniation from 9 databases.

Author(s): 
Li, Xinhua
Han, Yingchao
Cui, Jian
Yuan, Ping
Di, Zhi
Li, Lijun
Publication Title: 
BMC pregnancy and childbirth

BACKGROUND: A longitudinal repeated measures design over pregnancy and post-birth, with a control group would provide insight into the mechanical adaptations of the body under conditions of changing load during a common female human lifespan condition, while minimizing the influences of inter human differences.

Author(s): 
Gilleard, Wendy L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Neurophysiology

In the appendicular skeleton, substantial evidence demonstrates that somatosensory input from deep tissues including limb muscles and joints elicits somatosympathetic reflexes. Much less is known about the presence and organization of these reflexes from the axial skeleton. We determined if mechanical loading of the lumbar spine and lumbar paraspinal muscle irritation reflexively affects postganglionic sympathetic nerve discharge (SND) to the spleen and kidney.

Author(s): 
Kang, Y. M.
Kenney, M. J.
Spratt, K. F.
Pickar, J. G.
Publication Title: 
BMC musculoskeletal disorders

BACKGROUND: The mechanisms thorough which spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) exerts clinical effects are not established. A prior study has suggested a dorsal horn modulated effect; however, the role of subject expectation was not considered. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of subject expectation on hypoalgesia associated with SMT. METHODS: Sixty healthy subjects agreed to participate and underwent quantitative sensory testing (QST) to their leg and low back.

Author(s): 
Bialosky, Joel E.
Bishop, Mark D.
Robinson, Michael E.
Barabas, Josh A.
George, Steven Z.
Publication Title: 
Physical Therapy

BACKGROUND: Current evidence suggests that spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is effective in the treatment of people with low back pain (LBP); however, the corresponding mechanisms are unknown. Hypoalgesia is associated with SMT and is suggestive of specific mechanisms. OBJECTIVE: The primary purpose of this study was to assess the immediate effects of SMT on thermal pain perception in people with LBP. A secondary purpose was to determine whether the resulting hypoalgesia was a local effect and whether psychological influences were associated with changes in pain perception.

Author(s): 
Bialosky, Joel E.
Bishop, Mark D.
Robinson, Michael E.
Zeppieri, Giorgio
George, Steven Z.
Publication Title: 
BMC musculoskeletal disorders

BACKGROUND: Although the connective tissues forming the fascial planes of the back have been hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic low back pain (LBP), there have been no previous studies quantitatively evaluating connective tissue structure in this condition. The goal of this study was to perform an ultrasound-based comparison of perimuscular connective tissue structure in the lumbar region in a group of human subjects with chronic or recurrent LBP for more than 12 months, compared with a group of subjects without LBP.

Author(s): 
Langevin, Helene M.
Stevens-Tuttle, Debbie
Fox, James R.
Badger, Gary J.
Bouffard, Nicole A.
Krag, Martin H.
Wu, Junru
Henry, Sharon M.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association

CONTEXT: Few studies have shown that diagnostic palpation is reliable. No studies have shown that the reliability of diagnostic palpatory skills can be maintained and improved over time. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the reliability of selected palpatory tests used to identify lumbar somatic dysfunction was maintained during a 4-month period as part of a clinical observational study. METHODS: Participants with low back pain and participants without low back pain, recruited from a rural Midwestern community, were examined during 6 separate sessions over a 4-month period.

Author(s): 
Degenhardt, Brian F.
Johnson, Jane C.
Snider, Karen T.
Snider, Eric J.
Publication Title: 
Cells, Tissues, Organs

Chronic musculoskeletal pain, including low back pain, is a worldwide debilitating condition; however, the mechanisms that underlie its development remain poorly understood. Pathological neuroplastic changes in the sensory innervation of connective tissue may contribute to the development of nonspecific chronic low back pain. Progress in understanding such potentially important abnormalities is hampered by limited knowledge of connective tissue's normal sensory innervation.

Author(s): 
Corey, Sarah M.
Vizzard, Margaret A.
Badger, Gary J.
Langevin, Helene M.

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