Lycopersicon esculentum

Publication Title: 
Food and Chemical Toxicology: An International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association

Most chronic diseases, including coronary heart disease and many types of cancer depend on the in vivo conversion of cellular macromolecules or of carcinogens to specific reactive, oxidized forms. For that reason, health promoting nutrition involves the daily intake of five to 10 vegetables and fruits, fruit juices, red wine and tea that are rich sources of micronutrients with antioxidant properties, including the antioxidant vitamins C, E and beta-carotene. Tomatoes contain lycopene, a stable, active antioxidant. Many vegetables contain quercetin and related polyphenolic compounds.

Author(s): 
Weisburger, J. H.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Separation Science

Diets in the countries of the Mediterranean basin are characterised by abundant plant foods (fruits, vegetables, breads, nuts, seeds, wine, and olive oil) and include fish and low-fat dairy products. Among the vegetables, tomatoes are a main component of the traditional Mediterranean diet, which has been associated with health protection and longevity. Eating tomatoes has been associated with reduced risks of some types of cancer and other diseases.

Author(s): 
GÛmez-Romero, MarÌa
Arr·ez-Rom·n, David
Segura-Carretero, Antonio
Fern·ndez-GutiÈrrez, Alberto
Publication Title: 
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Isotopically labeled tomato carotenoids, phytoene, phytofluene, and lycopene, are needed for mammalian bioavailability and metabolism research but are currently commercially unavailable. The goals of this work were to establish and screen multiple in vitro tomato cell lines for carotenoid production, test the best producers with or without the bleaching herbicides, norflurazon and 2-(4-chlorophenyl-thio)triethylamine (CPTA), and to use the greatest carotenoid accumulator for in vitro 13C-labeling.

Author(s): 
Engelmann, Nancy J.
Campbell, Jessica K.
Rogers, Randy B.
Rupassara, S. Indumathie
Garlick, Peter J.
Lila, Mary Ann
Erdman, John W.
Publication Title: 
Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.)

Epidemiological studies suggest an inverse relationship between tomato consumption and serum and tissue lycopene (LYC) levels with risk of some chronic diseases, including several cancers and cardiovascular disease. LYC, the red carotenoid found in tomatoes, is often considered to be the primary bioactive carotenoid in tomatoes that mediates health benefits, but other colorless precursor carotenoids, phytoene (PE) and phytofluene (PF), are also present in substantial quantities. PE and PF are readily absorbed from tomato foods and tomato extracts by humans.

Author(s): 
Engelmann, Nancy J.
Clinton, Steven K.
Erdman, John W.
Publication Title: 
Food Chemistry

While putative disease-preventing lycopene metabolites are found in both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) products and in their consumers, mammalian lycopene metabolism is poorly understood. Advances in tomato cell culturing techniques offer an economical tool for generation of highly-enriched (13)C-lycopene for human bioavailability and metabolism studies.

Author(s): 
Moran, Nancy Engelmann
Rogers, Randy B.
Lu, Chi-Hua
Conlon, Lauren E.
Lila, Mary Ann
Clinton, Steven K.
Erdman, John W.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.)

To determine whether dietary modifications with tomato products and/or a soy supplement affected circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and other markers of cell signaling in postmenopausal women at risk for developing breast cancer. Eligible and consented postmenopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer were enrolled in a 26-week, two-arm (tomato and soy, 10 weeks each) longitudinal dietary intervention study in which each woman served as her own control.

Author(s): 
McLaughlin, John M.
Olivo-Marston, Susan
Vitolins, Mara Z.
Bittoni, Marisa
Reeves, Katherine W.
Degraffinreid, Cecilia R.
Schwartz, Steven J.
Clinton, Steven K.
Paskett, Electra D.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.)

To determine whether dietary modifications with tomato products and/or a soy supplement affected circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and other markers of cell signaling in postmenopausal women at risk for developing breast cancer. Eligible and consented postmenopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer were enrolled in a 26-week, two-arm (tomato and soy, 10 weeks each) longitudinal dietary intervention study in which each woman served as her own control.

Author(s): 
McLaughlin, John M.
Olivo-Marston, Susan
Vitolins, Mara Z.
Bittoni, Marisa
Reeves, Katherine W.
Degraffinreid, Cecilia R.
Schwartz, Steven J.
Clinton, Steven K.
Paskett, Electra D.
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