Lymph

Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association

The thoracic pump and the abdominal pump are osteopathic manipulative (OM) lymphatic pump techniques frequently used by osteopathic physicians to treat patients with infections (eg, pneumonia, otitis media). Although there is a widely accepted belief among the osteopathic medical profession that increasing lymphatic flow is beneficial, no measurements of lymph flow during osteopathic manipulative treatment have been reported. The authors surgically instrumented five mongrel dogs to record lymphatic flow in the thoracic duct (TDF) and cardiac variables during three intervention protocols.

Author(s): 
Knott, E. Marty
Tune, Johnathan D.
Stoll, Scott T.
Downey, H. Fred
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition

We conducted this study to determine whether green tea constituents, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and caffeine, affect the intestinal absorption of cholesterol (CH), fat, and other fat-soluble compounds. Ovariectomized rats with lymph cannula were infused intraduodenally with a lipid emulsion containing 14C-labeled CH (14C-CH), alpha-tocopherol (alpha TOH), triolein, and sodium taurocholate, without (control) or with EGCG, caffeine, or EGCG plus caffeine, in PBS, pH 6.5.

Author(s): 
Wang, Shu
Noh, Sang K.
Koo, Sung I.
Publication Title: 
Lymphatic Research and Biology

BACKGROUND: Lymphatic pump techniques (LPT) are used clinically by osteopathic practitioners for the treatment of edema and infection; however, the mechanisms by which LPT enhances lymphatic circulation and provides protection during infection are not understood. Rhythmic compressions on the abdomen during LPT compress the abdominal area, including the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), which may facilitate the release of leukocytes from these tissues into the lymphatic circulation.

Author(s): 
Hodge, Lisa M.
Bearden, Melissa K.
Schander, Artur
Huff, Jamie B.
Williams, Arthur
King, Hollis H.
Downey, H. Fred
Publication Title: 
Lymphatic Research and Biology

BACKGROUND: Osteopathic lymphatic pump treatments (LPT) are used to treat edema, but their direct effects on lymph flow have not been studied. In the current study, we examined the effects of LPT on lymph flow in the thoracic duct of instrumented conscious dogs in the presence of edema produced by constriction of the inferior vena cava (IVC). METHODS AND RESULTS: Six dogs were surgically instrumented with an ultrasonic flow transducer on the thoracic lymph duct and catheters in the descending thoracic aorta and in IVC.

Author(s): 
Prajapati, Parna
Shah, Pankhil
King, Hollis H.
Williams, Arthur G.
Desai, Pratikkumar
Downey, H. Fred
Publication Title: 
Lymphatic Research and Biology

BACKGROUND: Lymphatic pump techniques (LPT) are used by osteopathic practitioners for the treatment of edema and infection; however, the mechanisms by which LPT enhances the lymphatic and immune systems are poorly understood. METHODS AND RESULTS: To measure the effect of LPT on the rat, the cisterna chyli (CC) of 10 rats were cannulated and lymph was collected during 4 min of 1) pre-LPT baseline, 2) 4 min LPT, and 3) 10 min post-LPT recovery. LPT increased significantly (p < 0.05) lymph flow from a baseline of 24 ± 5 μl/min to 89 ± 30 μl/min.

Author(s): 
Huff, Jamie B.
Schander, Artur
Downey, H. Fred
Hodge, Lisa M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Nuclear Medicine: Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine

Lymphedema-edema that results from chronic lymphatic insufficiency-is a chronic debilitating disease that is frequently misdiagnosed, treated too late, or not treated at all. There are, however, effective therapies for lymphedema that can be implemented, particularly after the disorder is properly diagnosed and characterized with lymphoscintigraphy. On the basis of the lymphoscintigraphic image pattern, it is often possible to determine whether the limb swelling is due to lymphedema and, if so, whether compression garments, massage, or surgery is indicated.

Author(s): 
Szuba, Andrzej
Shin, William S.
Strauss, H. William
Rockson, Stanley
Publication Title: 
Lymphology

Obliteration of lymphatic collecting trunks of limbs by infective processes, trauma, oncologic surgery and irradiation bring about retention of lymph and tissue fluid in tissues. Knowledge as to where excess lymph is produced and accumulates as tissue fluid is indispensable for rational physical therapy. So far, this knowledge has been based on lymphoscintigraphic, ultrasonographic and MR images. None of these modalities provides distinct images of dilated lymphatics and fluid expanded tissue spaces in dermis, subcutis and muscles.

Author(s): 
Olszewski, W. L.
Ambujam, P. Jain G.
Zaleska, M.
Cakala, M.
Publication Title: 
Lymphatic Research and Biology

BACKGROUND: The knowledge of where does excess tissue fluid accumulate in obstructive lymphedema is indispensable for rational physical therapy. However, it has so far been limited to that obtained from lymphoscintigraphic, ultrasonographic, and MR images. None of these modalities provide composite pictures of dilated lymphatics and expanded tissue space in dermis, subcutis, and muscles. So far, only anatomical dissection and histological processing of biopsy material can visualize the tissue lymphatic network and the sites of accumulation of the excess of mobile tissue fluid.

Author(s): 
Olszewski, Waldemar L.
Jain, Pradeep
Ambujam, G.
Zaleska, Marzanna
Cakala, Marta
Publication Title: 
Phlebology / Venous Forum of the Royal Society of Medicine

The fibrous process of chronic ulcerated lesions of lower limbs can impair the mobility of the affected limb. The aim of this work was to assess the benefits of lymph drainage in patients who suffer from this disease. Twenty female and five male patients with ages ranging from 53 to 69 years (mean age 60.6 years) were evaluated. All had a history of at least 10 years of varicose veins and/or ulcerated lesions of the lower limbs with initial dermatofibrosis, with the positive Godet sign during the physical examination of the limb.

Author(s): 
Pereira de Godoy, J. M.
Braile, D. M.
de Fátima Guerreiro Godoy, M.
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