Magnetics

Publication Title: 
Journal of Hand Therapy: Official Journal of the American Society of Hand Therapists

The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hand therapy interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) based on the best available evidence. A qualitative systematic review was conducted. A literature search using 40 key terms was conducted from the earliest available date to January 2003 using seven databases. Articles were randomly assigned to two of five reviewers and evaluated according to predetermined criteria for inclusion at each of the title, abstract, and article levels.

Author(s): 
Muller, Monique
Tsui, Deborah
Schnurr, Ronda
Biddulph-Deisroth, Lori
Hard, Julie
Macdermid, Joy C.
Publication Title: 
Best Practice & Research. Clinical Rheumatology

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has gained increasing popularity, particularly among individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) for which traditional medicine has generally been ineffective. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs on CAM studies for FMS was conducted to evaluate the empirical evidence for their effectiveness. Few RCTs achieved high scores on the CONSORT, a standardized evaluation of the quality of methodology reporting.

Author(s): 
Holdcraft, Laura C.
Assefi, Nassim
Buchwald, Dedra
Publication Title: 
Best Practice & Research. Clinical Rheumatology

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has gained increasing popularity, particularly among individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) for which traditional medicine has generally been ineffective. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs on CAM studies for FMS was conducted to evaluate the empirical evidence for their effectiveness. Few RCTs achieved high scores on the CONSORT, a standardized evaluation of the quality of methodology reporting.

Author(s): 
Holdcraft, Laura C.
Assefi, Nassim
Buchwald, Dedra
Publication Title: 
BMC musculoskeletal disorders

BACKGROUND: Treatment efficacy of physical agents in osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) pain has been largely unknown, and this systematic review was aimed at assessing their short-term efficacies for pain relief. METHODS: Systematic review with meta-analysis of efficacy within 1-4 weeks and at follow up at 1-12 weeks after the end of treatment. RESULTS: 36 randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) were identified with 2434 patients where 1391 patients received active treatment. 33 trials satisfied three or more out of five methodological criteria (Jadad scale).

Author(s): 
Bjordal, Jan M.
Johnson, Mark I.
Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo A. B.
Bogen, Bård
Chow, Roberta
Ljunggren, Anne E.
Publication Title: 
Best Practice & Research. Clinical Rheumatology

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has gained increasing popularity, particularly among individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) for which traditional medicine has generally been ineffective. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs on CAM studies for FMS was conducted to evaluate the empirical evidence for their effectiveness. Few RCTs achieved high scores on the CONSORT, a standardized evaluation of the quality of methodology reporting.

Author(s): 
Holdcraft, Laura C.
Assefi, Nassim
Buchwald, Dedra
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Stem cells are increasingly the focus of translational research as well as having emerging roles in human cellular therapy. To support these uses there is a need for improved methods for in vivo cell localization and tracking. In this study, we examined the effects of cell labeling on the in vitro functionality of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Our results provide a basis for future in vivo studies investigating implanted cell fate and longevity.

Author(s): 
Blaber, Sinead P.
Hill, Cameron J.
Webster, Rebecca A.
Say, Jana M.
Brown, Louise J.
Wang, Shih-Chang
Vesey, Graham
Herbert, Benjamin Ross
Publication Title: 
Medizinische Monatsschrift
Author(s): 
Eis, G.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Medicine

It is well known that the end of the nineteenth century represented a 'golden age' of hysteria and hypnosis research under Jean-Martin Charcot in Paris, but the extent to which metals and magnets figured in this strange and provocative world has been very incompletely told. This paper offers itself as a first corrective to this neglect. In 1876 a certain elderly physician and mesmerist, Victor Burq, asked the Parisian Société de Biologie formally to establish the validity of his so-called 'metallotherapy' (later 'metalloscopy') treatment for hysteria.

Author(s): 
Harrington, A.
Publication Title: 
Bioelectrochemistry (Amsterdam, Netherlands)

Acute microhemodynamic effects of static and alternating magnetic fields at a threshold level were investigated on modulating the muscle capillary mirocirculation in pentobarbital-anesthetized mice. The skin in a tibialis anterior was circularly removed with 1.5 mm diameter for intravital-microscopic recording of the capillary blood velocity in the tibialis anterior muscle. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran (MW 150 kDa) was used for an in vivo fluorescent plasma marker of the muscle capillaries.

Author(s): 
Xu, S.
Okano, H.
Ohkubo, C.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

This article details the atmosphere surrounding the scientific community in France in 1784, the year of the Franklin Commission's report on Mesmer. The end of the 18th century heralded a victory of observation over systems and theories. Animal magnetism found itself in the midst of a conflict between the Old and the New World. The Franklin Commission, like so many other commissions at the time, was looking for measurable and quantifiable phenomena, the sole basis of progress in the health sciences. Mesmer and his system failed the test and were publicly denigrated.

Author(s): 
Laurence, Jean-Roch

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