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Publication Title: 
Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien

OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence supporting selected complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Author(s): 
Shen, Yi-Hao A.
Nahas, Richard
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Asthma: Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a treatment option for asthma. METHOD: Seven databases were searched from their inception to October 2010. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and non-randomized clinical trials (NRCTs) were considered, if they investigated any type of yoga in patients with asthma. The selection of studies, data extraction, and validation were performed independently by two reviewers. RESULTS: Six RCTs and one NRCT met the inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality was mostly poor.

Author(s): 
Posadzki, Paul
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Aging & Mental Health

OBJECTIVES: This systematic review examined empirical evidence of the effects of relaxation interventions on anxiety and depression among older adults. METHOD: A comprehensive literature search identified studies that satisfied the pre-set inclusion and exclusion criteria. We focused on 15 published and non-published studies - 12 randomised controlled trials and three non-randomised controlled trials - undertaken in the past 20 years (1994-2014). Three reviewers selected studies, extracted data, and appraised the methodological quality.

Author(s): 
Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee
Oo, Win Nuang
Suzanne Yew, Pey Ying
Lau, Ying
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a treatment option for menopausal symptoms. METHODS: We searched the literature using 14 databases from their inception to July 2008 and included all types of clinical studies regardless of their design. The methodological quality of all studies was assessed using a modified Jadad score. RESULTS: Seven studies met our inclusion criteria. Two randomized clinical trials compared the effects of yoga with those of walking or physical exercise.

Author(s): 
Lee, Myeong Soo
Kim, Jong-In
Ha, Jeong Yong
Boddy, Kate
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Fear of falling is common in older people and associated with serious physical and psychosocial consequences. Exercise (planned, structured, repetitive and purposive physical activity aimed at improving physical fitness) may reduce fear of falling by improving strength, gait, balance and mood, and reducing the occurrence of falls. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (benefits, harms and costs) of exercise interventions for reducing fear of falling in older people living in the community.

Author(s): 
Kendrick, Denise
Kumar, Arun
Carpenter, Hannah
Zijlstra, G. A. Rixt
Skelton, Dawn A.
Cook, Juliette R.
Stevens, Zoe
Belcher, Carolyn M.
Haworth, Deborah
Gawler, Sheena J.
Gage, Heather
Masud, Tahir
Bowling, Ann
Pearl, Mirilee
Morris, Richard W.
Iliffe, Steve
Delbaere, Kim
Publication Title: 
Hu Li Za Zhi The Journal of Nursing

BACKGROUND: Aging and age-related health problems are major issues of concern for community health services. Yoga is an exercise with both physiological and psychological effects on aging. Although many studies have assessed the effectiveness of yoga in the elderly, little information is available in the literature to support empirical conclusions. PURPOSE: This review synthesizes and characterizes findings related to the effects of yoga on depression and quality of sleep in the elderly.

Author(s): 
Wang, You-Yin
Chang, Hsiao-Yun
Lin, Chen-Yu
Publication Title: 
Academic Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence for clinical applications of yoga among the pediatric population. METHODS: We conducted an electronic literature search including CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE, Medline, PsycINFO, and manual search of retrieved articles from inception of each database until December 2008. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs) were selected that included yoga or yoga-based interventions for individuals aged 0 to 21 years.

Author(s): 
Birdee, Gurjeet S.
Yeh, Gloria Y.
Wayne, Peter M.
Phillips, Russell S.
Davis, Roger B.
Gardiner, Paula
Publication Title: 
Journal of Physical Activity & Health

BACKGROUND: This study describes evidence of yoga's effectiveness for depressive disorders, general anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adults. We also address adverse events associated with yoga. METHODS: We searched multiple electronic databases for systematic reviews (SRs) published between 2008 and July 2014, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) not identified in eligible SRs, and ongoing RCTs registered with ClincalTrials.gov. RESULTS: We identified 1 SR on depression, 1 for adverse events, and 3 addressing multiple conditions.

Author(s): 
Duan-Porter, Wei
Coeytaux, Remy R.
McDuffie, Jennifer R.
Goode, Adam P.
Sharma, Poonam
Mennella, Hillary
Nagi, Avishek
Williams, John W.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

BACKGROUND: Introducing patients with cancer to the practice of yoga can be beneficial for coping with the side effects of treatment and the psychological aspects of cancer that are often difficult and distressing for patients. Oncology nurses can learn to use simple yoga techniques for themselves and as interventions with their patients. OBJECTIVES: This article provides details about the development and implementation of a yoga class for patients with cancer and provides details about other ways nurses can integrate yoga into oncology nursing and cancer care.

Author(s): 
Sisk, Angela
Fonteyn, Marsha
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: In older adults, diminished balance is associated with reduced physical functioning and an increased risk of falling. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2007. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of exercise interventions on balance in older people, aged 60 and over, living in the community or in institutional care. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1), MEDLINE and EMBASE (to February 2011).

Author(s): 
Howe, Tracey E.
Rochester, Lynn
Neil, Fiona
Skelton, Dawn A.
Ballinger, Claire

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