Manipulation, Spinal

Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Emergency Medicine

BACKGROUND: A total of 2.7 million patients present to US emergency departments annually for management of low back pain (LBP). Despite optimal medical therapy, more than 50% remain functionally impaired 3 months later. We performed a systematic review to address the following question: Among patients with nonchronic LBP, does spinal manipulation, massage, exercise, or yoga, when combined with standard medical therapy, improve pain and functional outcomes more than standard medical therapy alone?

Author(s): 
Rothberg, Samantha
Friedman, Benjamin W.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To conduct a systematic review of the randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of complementary/alternative (CAM) therapies in the treatment of non-migrainous headache (i.e. excluding migraine, cluster and organic headaches). DESIGN: Systematic review with quality scoring and evidence tables. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of RCTs per therapy, quality scores, evidence tables. RESULTS: Twenty-four RCTs were identified in the categories of acupuncture, spinal manipulation, electrotherapy, physiotherapy, homeopathy and other therapies.

Author(s): 
Vernon, H.
McDermaid, C. S.
Hagino, C.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To conduct a systematic review of the randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of complementary/alternative (CAM) therapies in the treatment of non-migrainous headache (i.e. excluding migraine, cluster and organic headaches). DESIGN: Systematic review with quality scoring and evidence tables. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of RCTs per therapy, quality scores, evidence tables. RESULTS: Twenty-four RCTs were identified in the categories of acupuncture, spinal manipulation, electrotherapy, physiotherapy, homeopathy and other therapies.

Author(s): 
Vernon, H.
McDermaid, C. S.
Hagino, C.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Low-back pain is one of the most common and costly musculoskeletal problems in modern society. Proponents of massage therapy claim it can minimize pain and disability, and speed return to normal function. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of massage therapy for non-specific low-back pain. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched Medline, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, HealthSTAR, CINAHL and Dissertation abstracts from their beginning to May 2001 with no language restrictions. References in the included studies and in reviews of the literature were screened.

Author(s): 
Furlan, A. D.
Brosseau, L.
Imamura, M.
Irvin, E.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

BACKGROUND: Few treatments for back pain are supported by strong scientific evidence. Conventional treatments, although widely used, have had limited success. Dissatisfied patients have, therefore, turned to complementary and alternative medical therapies and providers for care for back pain. PURPOSE: To provide a rigorous and balanced summary of the best available evidence about the effectiveness, safety, and costs of the most popular complementary and alternative medical therapies used to treat back pain. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register.

Author(s): 
Cherkin, Daniel C.
Sherman, Karen J.
Deyo, Richard A.
Shekelle, Paul G.
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted. OBJECTIVE: To compare medication, needle acupuncture, and spinal manipulation for managing chronic (>13 weeks duration) spinal pain because the value of medicinal and popular forms of alternative care for chronic spinal pain syndromes is uncertain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Between February 1999 and October 2001, 115 patients without contraindication for the three treatment regimens were enrolled at the public hospital's multidisciplinary spinal pain unit.

Author(s): 
Giles, Lynton G. F.
Muller, Reinhold
Publication Title: 
Headache

BACKGROUND: Primary headache disorders, especially migraine, are commonly accompanied by neck pain or other symptoms. Because of this, physical therapy (PT) and other physical treatments are often prescribed. This review updates and synthesizes published clinical trial evidence, systematic reviews, and case series regarding the efficacy of selected physical modalities in the treatment of primary headache disorders.

Author(s): 
Biondi, David M.
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: Best evidence synthesis. OBJECTIVE: To identify, critically appraise, and synthesize literature from 1980 through 2006 on noninvasive interventions for neck pain and its associated disorders. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: No comprehensive systematic literature reviews have been published on interventions for neck pain and its associated disorders in the past decade.

Author(s): 
Hurwitz, Eric L.
Carragee, Eugene J.
van der Velde, Gabrielle
Carroll, Linda J.
Nordin, Margareta
Guzman, Jaime
Peloso, Paul M.
Holm, Lena W.
Côté, Pierre
Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah
Cassidy, J. David
Haldeman, Scott
Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: Best evidence synthesis. OBJECTIVE: To provide evidence-based guidance to primary care clinicians about how to best assess and treat patients with neck pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: There is a need to translate the results of clinical and epidemiologic studies into meaningful and practical information for clinicians.

Author(s): 
Guzman, Jaime
Haldeman, Scott
Carroll, Linda J.
Carragee, Eugene J.
Hurwitz, Eric L.
Peloso, Paul
Nordin, Margareta
Cassidy, J. David
Holm, Lena W.
Côté, Pierre
van der Velde, Gabrielle
Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah
Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Low-back pain is one of the most common and costly musculoskeletal problems in modern society. Proponents of massage therapy claim it can minimize pain and disability, and speed return to normal function. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of massage therapy for non-specific low-back pain. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL from their beginning to May 2008. We also searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2006, issue 3), HealthSTAR and Dissertation abstracts up to 2006. There were no language restrictions.

Author(s): 
Furlan, Andrea D.
Imamura, Marta
Dryden, Trish
Irvin, Emma

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