Marital Therapy

Publication Title: 
The Psychiatric Clinics of North America

Extramarital sexual relationships constitute one of the most common problems encountered in marital therapy. They present both of the marital partners with highly emotionally charged dilemmas that must be resolved. Once believed to occur because a married person was weak, immoral, or neurotic, they are now understood to occur because of a variety of reasons. While almost a third of these cases end in divorce, others respond to appropriate treatment so that the marriages may be maintained, although with varying degrees of happiness for these couples.

Author(s): 
Humphrey, F. G.
Publication Title: 
Community Mental Health Journal

This paper describes one variation in the battering phenomenon which was initially observed among low-income women. The strategies of coercion and deception utilized by the abusive male in these relationships are described and compared with similar strategies of "mind control" utilized in more traditional "cultic" systems. The debilitating effects of these techniques on the battered female are described, as is the battering male's own separation reaction, and the probable dynamics of the men and women involved in this pathological family system.

Author(s): 
Boulette, T. R.
Andersen, S. M.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Psychotherapy

This paper has examined the cold-sick/love-sick pattern of a couple's interaction and presented a schema for intervening with the less accessible, but pivotal partner--usually the husband. The importance of carefully attending to the wife's needs, expectations, wishes, and frustrations has been understood. She is not to be considered an ace-in-the-hole. Acknowledging her needs, while gently urging her husband out of his protective covering will enhance a therapist's ability to enter the relationship system.

Author(s): 
Beck, R. L.
Publication Title: 
Family Process

Received wisdom suggests that boundaries are, or should be, important in intimate relationships. In this essay, we focus primarily upon the beliefs and phenomenology relating to a variety of boundaries, and provide a discussion of some conceptual issues, in order to understand better the development, facilitation, and maintenance of, as well as restraints upon, intimacy. Although we attend mainly to dyadic relationships, we believe that our observations and suggestions have application to larger groups.

Author(s): 
Ryder, R. G.
Bartle, S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association

Just as the couple becomes the repository of both partners' conscious and unconscious sexual fantasies and desires, and of their consciously and unconsciously activated internalized object relations, so does the couple activate both partners' conscious and unconscious superego functions. The interaction of the partners' superego over time results in the forging of a new system, which I am calling the couple's superego. The functions of the couple's joint superego structure is described, as are the symptoms of superego pathology in the couple's love life.

Author(s): 
Kernberg, O. F.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy

This study examines the effect of therapeutic changes in a couple's self-disclosure behavior and its impact on their perception of their marital intimacy. Twenty couples participated in 10 weekly sessions of structured self-disclosure. The Self-Disclosure Coding System was used to rate audiotapes of the second and ninth sessions. Two rates, blind to treatment condition, demonstrated high interrater reliability on measures of changes in: 1) amount of self-disclosure; 2) whether self-references were positive, negative, or neutral; 3) depth of disclosures; and 4) rate of self-reference.

Author(s): 
Waring, E. M.
Schaefer, B.
Fry, R.
Publication Title: 
Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift (1946)

Mobility of partnership increases in our times. There is a multifactorial package of causes with different preponderance in different age groups. Named be for example: the increasing average age of mankind with prolonged activities, emancipation of women, as well as sexual emancipation, new social structures etc., etc. If we analyse the factors which not only count for one single moment but in the long run for evolution of partnerships we see many different aspects.

Author(s): 
Barolin, G. S.
Publication Title: 
Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift (1946)

Within the different cultural epochs there exist different concepts of what is to be meant by 'love', 'marriage', 'human communication'. Maybe we are presently in the process of a paradigmatic change. However certain basic laws within human relations will always persist, such as: erotics, attraction, strive to social security, necessity to combine positive and negative within longer lasting human relations etc. Above all there is a great individual variability. There exist no one-way solutions.

Author(s): 
Barolin, G. S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy

Romantic jealousy is often experienced after a situation is interpreted as threatening to one's intimate relationship and can involve elements of other emotions such as anger, fear, and sadness. An individual experiencing jealousy may engage in a number of behaviors and thought processes aimed at reducing jealousy or keeping the relationship intact. However, these cognitions and behaviors may not achieve either of these goals and may escalate problems in the relationship.

Author(s): 
Cano, A.
O'Leary, K. D.
Publication Title: 
Family Process

In this study, 605 subjects were asked about romantic love and marriage. Married people differentiated themselves from single people with stable partners and divorced people with new partners by more frequently living together with their great love, more reciprocity in that love, and less disappointments in love relationships prior to the current relationship; but they also described themselves as less happy and satisfied than the single and divorced respondents, particularly with regard to tenderness, sex, and conversation with their partners.

Author(s): 
Willi, J.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Marital Therapy