Maternal Health Services

Publication Title: 
Reproductive Health Matters

Issues arising from the death of Savita Halappanavar in Ireland in October 2012 include the question of whether it is unethical to refuse to terminate a non-viable pregnancy when the woman's life may be at risk. In Catholic maternity services, this decision intersects with health professionals' interpretation of Catholic health policy on treatment of miscarriage as well as the law on abortion. This paper explores how these issues came together around Savita's death and the consequences for pregnant women and maternity services worldwide.

Author(s): 
Berer, Marge
Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

This article documents the historical factors that led to shifts in mission work toward a greater emphasis on community health for the poor and most vulnerable of society in sub-Saharan Africa after 1945. Using the example of the Medical Mission Sisters from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and their work in Ghana, we challenge the conventional narrative of medical missions as agents of imperialism.

Author(s): 
Johnson, Lauren
Wall, Barbra Mann
Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

Access to health care has been a factor for patients living in isolated mountain regions. The Frontier Nursing service was a pioneer in reaching those patients living in the most remote regions of Appalachia. Geography, demographics, and culture present obstacles for rural residents and health care providers. This article identifies and describes the roles nurses and nurse practitioners played in caring for Appalachian families through a roving Health Wagon in the 1980s and 1990s in Southwest Virginia.

Author(s): 
Snyder, Audrey
Thatcher, Esther
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

AIM: This paper is a report of a descriptive study of midwives' lived experiences of caring for lesbian women and their partners. BACKGROUND: A growing body of qualitative studies describes lesbian women's experiences of maternity care. Studies about midwives' caring experiences in the encounter are needed to improve care for lesbian women and their partners. METHOD: A qualitative study, using a phenomenological-hermeneutical method influenced by Ricoeur was conducted. Eleven midwives were recruited by snowball method.

Author(s): 
Spidsberg, Bente Dahl
S¯rlie, Venke
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Lay health workers (LHWs) perform functions related to healthcare delivery, receive some level of training, but have no formal professional or paraprofessional certificate or tertiary education degree. They provide care for a range of issues, including maternal and child health. For LHW programmes to be effective, we need a better understanding of the factors that influence their success and sustainability.

Author(s): 
Glenton, Claire
Colvin, Christopher J.
Carlsen, Benedicte
Swartz, Alison
Lewin, Simon
Noyes, Jane
Rashidian, Arash
Publication Title: 
BMC pregnancy and childbirth

BACKGROUND: According to the Office for National Statistics, approximately a quarter of women giving birth in England and Wales are from minority ethnic groups. Previous work has indicated that these women have poorer pregnancy outcomes than White women and poorer experience of maternity care, sometimes encountering stereotyping and racism. The aims of this study were to examine service use and perceptions of care in ethnic minority women from different groups compared to White women. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data from a survey of women in 2010 was undertaken.

Author(s): 
Henderson, Jane
Gao, Haiyan
Redshaw, Maggie
Publication Title: 
Women and Birth: Journal of the Australian College of Midwives

BACKGROUND: Women born outside Australia make up more than a fifth of the Queensland birthing population and like migrants in other parts of the world face the challenges of cultural dislocation and possible language barriers. Recognising that labour and birth are major life events the aim was to investigate the experiences of these women in comparison to native-born English speaking women. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data from a population based survey of women who had recently birthed in Queensland.

Author(s): 
Hennegan, Julie
Redshaw, Maggie
Miller, Yvette
Publication Title: 
BMC health services research

BACKGROUND: To describe the maternity care experiences of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women in Queensland, Australia and to identify areas for policy and practice improvements. METHODS: A culturally-tailored survey requesting both quantitative and qualitative information was completed by respondents either independently (online or in hard copy) or with the assistance of a trained peer-interviewer.

Author(s): 
Parker, Susan
McKinnon, Loretta
Kruske, Sue
Publication Title: 
Revue D'epidemiologie Et De Sante Publique

BACKGROUND: In Morocco, the majority of maternal deaths and severe obstetrical complications occurs outside a health structure. If accessibility to a referral hospital is clearly a problem, this problem can be exacerbated by the perception that women and their family have of the quality of care received in these maternity services. The objective of this article is to explore how women who went through a severe obstetrical complication experienced their hospitalisation and to confront this experience with the caregivers'perception.

Author(s): 
Richard, F.
Filali, H.
Lardi, M.
de Brouwere, V.
Publication Title: 
Revue D'epidemiologie Et De Sante Publique

The Belgian health system imposes no regulations regarding antenatal care. A special study was carried out by questionnaire in a sample of 32 maternity units representative of the French-speaking region to determine the coverage rate achieved by the health system. The study also compared the private and public sectors for rate of use, socioeconomic profile of users and regularity of antenatal care. Overall results show that despite the generosity of the system, a utilization rate of 98.8%, and a coverage rate of 84%, are reached.

Author(s): 
Wollast, E.
Vandenbussche, P.
Buekens, P.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Maternal Health Services