Maternal Welfare

Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Disagreement over the legitimacy of direct sterilization continues within Catholic moral debate, with painful and at times confusing ramifications for Catholic healthcare systems. This paper argues that the medical profession should be construed as a key moral authority in this debate, on two grounds. First, the recent revival of neo-Aristotelianism in moral philosophy as applied to medical ethics has brought out the inherently moral dimensions of the history and current practice of medicine.

Author(s): 
Cowdin, Daniel M.
Tuohey, John F.
Publication Title: 
The Practising Midwife
Author(s): 
Spencer, Sue
Publication Title: 
Medical Anthropology Quarterly

Various theories exist for the ways in which social and material disparities are incorporated within human bodies and then expressed as health outcomes with uneven distributions. From a political economy perspective, one pathway involves processes of social exclusion that take place on articulating local and global fields of power. This study explores such situated processes as they produce and perpetuate embodied inequality at childbirth in the Kilombero Valley of South-Central Tanzania.

Author(s): 
Spangler, Sydney A.
Publication Title: 
Population Bulletin of the United Nations
Publication Title: 
Children in the Tropics
Author(s): 
Chauliac, M.
Masse-raimbault, A. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To identify common treatments used for low-back pain (LBP) during pregnancy. DESIGN: A two-part anonymous survey. SETTING/LOCATION: New Haven, Connecticut. SUBJECTS: Pregnant women and providers of prenatal health care (nurse educators, nurse midwives, and obstetricians). RESULTS: We found that the majority of pregnant women who participated in our survey (61.7%) reported that they would accept complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy as treatment for LBP during pregnancy.

Author(s): 
Wang, Shu-Ming
DeZinno, Peggy
Fermo, Leona
William, Keith
Caldwell-Andrews, Alison A.
Bravemen, Ferne
Kain, Zeev N.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy of yoga on pregnancy outcomes. DESIGN AND SETTING: Three hundred thirty five (335) women attending the antenatal clinic at Gunasheela Surgical and Maternity Hospital in Bangalore, India, were enrolled between 18 and 20 weeks of pregnancy in a prospective, matched, observational study; 169 women in the yoga group and 166 women in the control group. METHODS: Women were matched for age, parity, body weight, and Doppler velocimetry scores of umbilical and uterine arteries.

Author(s): 
Narendran, Shamanthakamani
Nagarathna, Raghuram
Narendran, Vivek
Gunasheela, Sulochana
Nagendra, Hongasandra Rama Rao
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To identify common treatments used for low-back pain (LBP) during pregnancy. DESIGN: A two-part anonymous survey. SETTING/LOCATION: New Haven, Connecticut. SUBJECTS: Pregnant women and providers of prenatal health care (nurse educators, nurse midwives, and obstetricians). RESULTS: We found that the majority of pregnant women who participated in our survey (61.7%) reported that they would accept complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy as treatment for LBP during pregnancy.

Author(s): 
Wang, Shu-Ming
DeZinno, Peggy
Fermo, Leona
William, Keith
Caldwell-Andrews, Alison A.
Bravemen, Ferne
Kain, Zeev N.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery

Pregnant women with a third trimester breech presentation are almost invariably offered Caesarean section as the mode of delivery of first choice, especially when external version has failed to turn the fetus to cephalic. However, increasingly women are resorting to alternatives, to avoid either operative delivery or manipulative intervention in late pregnancy. This paper reviews some of the options for women with breech presentation, focusing especially on integrating these options into conventional maternity care.

Author(s): 
Tiran, Denise
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To identify common treatments used for low-back pain (LBP) during pregnancy. DESIGN: A two-part anonymous survey. SETTING/LOCATION: New Haven, Connecticut. SUBJECTS: Pregnant women and providers of prenatal health care (nurse educators, nurse midwives, and obstetricians). RESULTS: We found that the majority of pregnant women who participated in our survey (61.7%) reported that they would accept complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy as treatment for LBP during pregnancy.

Author(s): 
Wang, Shu-Ming
DeZinno, Peggy
Fermo, Leona
William, Keith
Caldwell-Andrews, Alison A.
Bravemen, Ferne
Kain, Zeev N.

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