Medical Indigency

Publication Title: 
Health Services Research

Health care for the indigent is a major problem in the United States. This review of the literature on health care for the indigent was undertaken to determine which major questions remain unresolved. Overall, this article finds that a very large pool of individuals under age 65 are at risk of being medically indigent.

Author(s): 
Bazzoli, G. J.
Publication Title: 
Southern Medical Journal

Influences upon the development and evolution of nursing groups and the profession have been multifactorial: cultural, economic, political, and social. Although monastic and chivalric orders throughout antiquity provided the beginnings with hierarchical organizations and a sense of voluntarism and vocation, it was not until the mid-19th century that the concept of a nursing service became codified and more hospital-oriented. The inception of a matronized nursing service in the Mobile City Hospital under the tutelage of the Superintendent, Dr.

Author(s): 
Salley, R. K.
Rodning, C. B.
Publication Title: 
The Rand Journal of Economics

This article studies provision of charity care by private, nonprofit hospitals. We demonstrate that in the absence of large positive income effects on charity care supply, convex preferences for the nonprofit hospital imply crowding out by other private or government hospitals. Extending our model to include impure altruism (rivalry) provides a possible explanation for the previously reported empirical result that both crowding out and income effects on indigent care supply are often weak or insignificant.

Author(s): 
Frank, R. G.
Salkever, D. S.
Publication Title: 
Tropical Doctor

Altruism on the part of doctors and other health workers may help make health services affordable for the poor, but the altruistic contribution of doctors who are nationals of developing countries has largely been ignored. This paper describes the results of two related surveys carried out between February and April 2001 to determine the characteristics of indigenous charitable clinics in Patan, Nepal, and the attitudes of the Nepali health professionals who work in them. In 2001, 33 Nepali health professionals were working without payment in 13 charitable clinics in Patan.

Author(s): 
Allaby, Martin A. K.
Publication Title: 
Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry

Leaders of health professional schools often support community-based education as a means of promoting emerging practitioners' awareness of health disparities and commitment to serving the poor. Yet, most programs do not teach about the causes of health disparities, raising questions regarding what social and political lessons students learn from these experiences. This article examines the ways in which community-based clinical education programs help shape the subjectivities of new dentists as ethical clinician-citizens within the US commodified health care system.

Author(s): 
Rivkin-Fish, Michele
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

A bilingual survey was developed to collect information regarding socio-demographics, access to medical and dental care, health insurance coverage, perceived health status, and use of folk medicine providers from 70 adults presenting to a health fair in South Los Angeles County. Ninety-seven percent of respondents were foreign-born. Seventy-nine percent reported having no health insurance during the year prior to survey. Of the uninsured, 61 percent lacked a doctor visit and 76 percent lacked a dental visit during the previous year.

Author(s): 
Macias, E. P.
Morales, L. S.
Subscribe to RSS - Medical Indigency