Medicalization

Publication Title: 
Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics: CQ: the international journal of healthcare ethics committees

Pharmaceuticals or other emerging technologies could be used to enhance (or diminish) feelings of lust, attraction, and attachment in adult romantic partnerships. Although such interventions could conceivably be used to promote individual (and couple) well-being, their widespread development and/or adoption might lead to the 'medicalization' of human love and heartache--for some, a source of a serious concern.

Author(s): 
Earp, Brian D.
Sandberg, Anders
Savulescu, Julian
Publication Title: 
Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics: CQ: the international journal of healthcare ethics committees

Would a "medicalization" of love be a "good" or "bad" form of medicalization? In discussing this question, Earp, Sandberg, and Savulescu primarily focus on the potential positive and negative consequences of turning love into a medical issue. But it can also be asked whether there is something intrinsically regrettable about medicalizing love. It is argued here that the medicalization of love can be seen as an "evaluative category mistake": it treats a core human value (love) as if it were mainly a means to other ends (viz.

Author(s): 
Nyholm, Sven
Publication Title: 
Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics: CQ: the international journal of healthcare ethics committees

According to human enhancement advocates, it is morally permissible (and sometimes obligatory) to use biomedical means to modulate or select certain biological traits in order to increase people's welfare, even when there is no pathology to be treated or prevented. Some authors have recently proposed to extend the use of biomedical means to modulate lust, attraction, and attachment.

Author(s): 
Giubilini, Alberto
Publication Title: 
Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics: CQ: the international journal of healthcare ethics committees

I raise several concerns with Earp and colleagues' analysis of enhancement through neurochemical modulation of love as a key issue in contemporary neuroethics.

Author(s): 
Bamford, Rebecca
Publication Title: 
Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics: CQ: the international journal of healthcare ethics committees

This is a critique of Earp, Sandberg and Savulescu's argument in support of a possible future neuromodulation of love and love-related relationships. I argue that, contrary to what is suggested by Earp, Sandberg and Savulescu, we do have good reason to be concerned about that possibility as well as about the medicalization of love that its pursuit would bring about.

Author(s): 
Hauskeller, Michael
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

This paper examines mindfulness as a popular and paradigmatic alternative healing practice within the context of contemporary medicalization trends. In recognition of the increasingly influential role popular media play in shaping ideas about illness and healing, what follows is a discursive analysis of bestselling mindfulness meditation self-help books and audio recordings by Jon Kabat-Zinn. The central and contradictory elements of this do-it-yourself healing practice as presented in these materials are best understood as aligned with medicalization trends for three principal reasons.

Author(s): 
Barker, Kristin K.
Publication Title: 
Sociology of Health & Illness

In a qualitative study, we investigated the medical motives of 100 Norwegian cannabis users, none of whom had legal access to medical cannabis. Cannabis was used therapeutically for conditions such as multiple sclerosis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and rheumatism, as well as for quality of life conditions such as quality of sleep, relaxation and wellbeing. The borders between medical and recreational cannabis use were blurred. This article identifies strategies of medical cannabis users to gain social acceptance.

Author(s): 
Pedersen, Willy
Sandberg, Sveinung
Publication Title: 
Cadernos De Saúde Pública

The virtues attributed to complementary therapies such as holistic and patient-centered approaches and stimulus for self-healing have been increasingly valued and could theoretically attenuate the current prevailing excessive social medicalization. Among such therapies, acupuncture has been highlighted due to its progressive institutionalization and acceptance.

Author(s): 
Silva, Emiliana Domingues Cunha da
Tesser, Charles Dalcanale
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