Medicine, East Asian Traditional

Publication Title: 
Seminars in Reproductive Medicine

Male factor is a common cause of infertility and the male partner must be systematically evaluated in the workup of every infertile couple. Various Eastern medical strategies have been tried with variable success. This article describes the clinical effects of Eastern medicine approaches including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, massage, yoga, tai chi, and qi gong, which could improve the sperm parameters and motility, genital inflammatory conditions, as well as immune system disorders, sexual dysfunction, and varicocele.

Author(s): 
Hu, Min
Zhang, Yuehui
Ma, Hongli
Ng, Ernest H. Y.
Wu, Xiao-Ke
Publication Title: 
Seminars in Reproductive Medicine

Male factor is a common cause of infertility and the male partner must be systematically evaluated in the workup of every infertile couple. Various Eastern medical strategies have been tried with variable success. This article describes the clinical effects of Eastern medicine approaches including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, massage, yoga, tai chi, and qi gong, which could improve the sperm parameters and motility, genital inflammatory conditions, as well as immune system disorders, sexual dysfunction, and varicocele.

Author(s): 
Hu, Min
Zhang, Yuehui
Ma, Hongli
Ng, Ernest H. Y.
Wu, Xiao-Ke
Publication Title: 
Seminars in Reproductive Medicine

Male factor is a common cause of infertility and the male partner must be systematically evaluated in the workup of every infertile couple. Various Eastern medical strategies have been tried with variable success. This article describes the clinical effects of Eastern medicine approaches including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, massage, yoga, tai chi, and qi gong, which could improve the sperm parameters and motility, genital inflammatory conditions, as well as immune system disorders, sexual dysfunction, and varicocele.

Author(s): 
Hu, Min
Zhang, Yuehui
Ma, Hongli
Ng, Ernest H. Y.
Wu, Xiao-Ke
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Palliative Nursing

Palliative medicine and complementary therapies (CTs) have developed within the NHS as parallel philosophies of care. As a result, the last decade has seen an increase in the integration and usage of CTs, as adjunct therapies to conventional medical treatment. Documented benefits of relaxation, decreased perception of pain, reduced anxiety and improved sense of wellbeing have been shown to enable an enhanced quality of life, where curative treatment is no longer an option. Reiki is a more recent addition to the range of CTs available to cancer patients.

Author(s): 
Burden, Barbara
Herron-Marx, Sandy
Clifford, Collette
Publication Title: 
Pharmaceutical Biology

CONTEXT: The Thai Lanna region has its own folklores and wisdoms in various fields such as traditional medicines. The galls of Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae) frequently appear in many Thai Lanna medicinal plant recipes for promoting longevity. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the in vitro anti-aging activities of the extracts from 15 plants including T. chebula gall selected from the Thai medicinal plant recipes that have been traditionally used for longevity.

Author(s): 
Manosroi, Aranya
Jantrawut, Pensak
Akihisa, Toshihiro
Manosroi, Worapaka
Manosroi, Jiradej
Publication Title: 
Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet Thangphaet

OBJECTIVE: Twenty one plants as ingredients of Thai traditional preparation called Sahasthara for relieve muscles pain and distal numbness were studied for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The extracts were obtained by maceration with 95% ethanol. They were tested for their antioxidant activity by DPPH scavenging assay and anti-inflammatory activity by determination of inhibitory activity on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 cell lines using Griess reagent.

Author(s): 
Kakatum, Narin
Jaiarree, Nuanjan
Makchucit, Sunita
Itharat, Arunporn
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Acinetobacter baumannii is well-recognized as an important nosocomial pathogen, however, due to their intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics, treatment options are limited. Synergistic effects between antibiotics and medicinal plants, particularly their active components, have intensively been studied as alternative approaches. METHODS: Fifty-one ethanol extracts obtained from 44 different selected medicinal plant species were tested for resistance modifying agents (RMAs) of novobiocin against A. baumannii using growth inhibition assay.

Author(s): 
Phatthalung, Pinanong Na
Chusri, Sasitorn
Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P.
Publication Title: 
Taehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi

PURPOSE: To examine the effect of Taegyo-focused prenatal classes on maternal-fetal attachment and self-efficacy related to childbirth. METHODS: Over 4 weeks, 49 women, 20 to 36 weeks of gestation participated in a prenatal program led by the nurse who developed it. In addition to Lamaze content it included; understanding ability of fetus to respond, sharing motivation, purpose of pregnancy, and preconceptions of experiencing childbirth, training in maternal-fetal interaction, writing letters and making a declaration of love to unborn baby.

Author(s): 
Chang, SoonBok
Park, Somi
Chung, ChaeWeon
Publication Title: 
Humane Health Care International

Loving kindness (metta), a traditional Buddhist concept, implies acting with compassion toward all sentient beings, with an awareness and appreciation of the natural world. The giving of metta, an integral part of Buddhist medicine, has the potential to enhance modern primary health care. Metta must be given with selflessness (saydana), compassion (karuna), and sympathetic joy (mudita). For the believer, Gautama Siddhartha, the Buddha, is the Supreme Healer. His ancient but timeless message of metta is alive and well today, The Dalai Lama being it key proponent.

Author(s): 
Aung, S. K. H.
Publication Title: 
Humane Health Care International

Loving kindness (metta), a traditional Buddhist concept, implies acting with compassion toward all sentient beings, with an awareness and appreciation of the natural world. The giving of metta, an integral part of Buddhist medicine, has the potential to enhance modern primary health care. Metta must be given with selflessness (saydana), compassion (karuna), and sympathetic joy (mudita). For the believer, Gautama Siddhartha, the Buddha, is the Supreme Healer. His ancient but timeless message of metta is alive and well today, The Dalai Lama being it key proponent.

Author(s): 
Aung, S. K. H.

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