Medicine, Tibetan Traditional

Publication Title: 
Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research

Tibetan medicine is known as the knowledge of healing in the Four Tantras, the main medical text studied by Tibetan doctors. In the 8th century, King Trisong Deutsen (718-785 CE) invited eminent physicians from India, China, Persia, East Turkestan, Mongolia, and Nepal for the First International Medical Symposium in Samye, Tibet and ordered his personal physician Elder Yuthog Yonten Gonpo (708-833 CE), who lived 125 years, and participated in this conference to summarize. By combining all the information available and presented during this symposium, he compiled the Four Tantras.

Author(s): 
Dakpa, Tenzing
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

This paper is intended to serve as a traditional Tibetan medical response to advancements in basic longevity research, with particular attention to current models of caloric restriction. This is a complicated task, as Tibetan medicine traditionally approaches dietary modification from a radically different perspective, and relies upon a complex model of health and balance in the treatment and prevention of disease. This paper offers a brief overview of the traditional Tibetan medicine (TTM) model and suggests potential areas for collaborative research on dietary modification.

Author(s): 
Dakpa, Tenzing
Dodson-Lavelle, Brooke
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

An overview of the concept of regeneration in Tibetan medicine is presented with descriptions of detoxification and tonification longevity protocols. The body must be fortified before receiving stronger treatments for regeneration. All disease is brought into balance with understanding of the interplay of the five elements, three humors, and their qualities and locations. The example of multiple sclerosis (MS) is given.

Author(s): 
Dhondup, Lobsang
Husted, Cynthia
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

The Indo-Tibetan tradition claims that proficiency in the suggested longevity practices of meditation, diet, and physical exercise (yoga), will result in profound anti-aging, stress-mediating and health enhancing effects. Western biomedical research has begun to demonstrate that the psychobiological states induced and cultivated by cognitive behavioral practices which are emblematic of those contained within the Indo-Tibetan tradition (hypnosis, meditation, visualization, systematic relaxation), indeed do have a profound impact on the body's protective and regulatory systems.

Author(s): 
Olivo, Erin L.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Tibetan medicine integrates diet, lifestyle, herbs, and accessory therapies to increase health and longevity. A comparison of the three humor theory of Tibetan medicine and the three thermodynamic phase properties of myelin lipids exemplifies how integrating medical systems can increase understanding of complex chronic disabling conditions.

Author(s): 
Husted, Cynthia
Dhondup, Lobsang
Publication Title: 
Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry

This article examines the transmission of Tibetan medical knowledge in the Himalayan region of Ladakh (India), taking three educational settings as ethnographic ports of entry. Each of these corresponds to a different operating mode in the standardisation of medical knowledge and learning processes, holding profound implications for the way this therapeutic tradition is known, valued, applied and passed on to the next generation.

Author(s): 
Pordié, Laurent
Blaikie, Calum
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

The Indo-Tibetan tradition claims that proficiency in the suggested longevity practices of meditation, diet, and physical exercise (yoga), will result in profound anti-aging, stress-mediating and health enhancing effects. Western biomedical research has begun to demonstrate that the psychobiological states induced and cultivated by cognitive behavioral practices which are emblematic of those contained within the Indo-Tibetan tradition (hypnosis, meditation, visualization, systematic relaxation), indeed do have a profound impact on the body's protective and regulatory systems.

Author(s): 
Olivo, Erin L.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

The Indo-Tibetan tradition claims that proficiency in the suggested longevity practices of meditation, diet, and physical exercise (yoga), will result in profound anti-aging, stress-mediating and health enhancing effects. Western biomedical research has begun to demonstrate that the psychobiological states induced and cultivated by cognitive behavioral practices which are emblematic of those contained within the Indo-Tibetan tradition (hypnosis, meditation, visualization, systematic relaxation), indeed do have a profound impact on the body's protective and regulatory systems.

Author(s): 
Olivo, Erin L.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

The theory and practice of traditional Tibetan medicine (TTM) is based on an understanding of a tri-level psycho-physical system; this bi-directional connection between the psycho-somatic realms is mediated by a distinct, yet inseparable energetic system--the subtle body. TTM practitioners approach both diagnosis and treatment from an understanding of this subtle energetic system. In the Tibetan yogic tradition, control of this system via advanced yogic and meditative technologies is the path to realize extraordinary levels of health, happiness, and longevity.

Author(s): 
Dakpa, Tenzing
Dodson-Lavelle, Brooke
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Traditional medical systems are challenging because their theories and practices strike many conventionally trained physicians and researchers as incomprehensible. Should modern medicine dismiss them as unscientific, view them as sources of alternatives hidden in a matrix of superstition, or regard them as complementary sciences of medicine? We make the latter argument using the example of Tibetan medicine.

Author(s): 
Loizzo, Joseph J.
Blackhall, Leslie J.
Rapgay, Lobsang

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