Meditative state

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Anxiety during pregnancy is a common problem. Anxiety and stress could have consequences on the course of the pregnancy and the later development of the child. Anxiety responds well to treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and/or medication. Non-pharmacological interventions such as mind-body interventions, known to decrease anxiety in several clinical situations, might be offered for treating and preventing anxiety during pregnancy.

Author(s): 
Marc, Isabelle
Toureche, Narimane
Ernst, Edzard
Hodnett, Ellen D.
Blanchet, Claudine
Dodin, Sylvie
Njoya, Merlin M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism

The metabolic syndrome, affecting a substantial and increasing percentage of the worldwide population, is comprised of a cluster of symptoms associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic conditions. Mind-body modalities based on Eastern philosophy, such as yoga, tai chi, qigong, and meditation, have become increasingly popular worldwide. These complementary therapies have many reported benefits for improving symptoms and physiological measures associated with the metabolic syndrome.

Author(s): 
Anderson, Joel G.
Taylor, Ann Gill
Publication Title: 
Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology

This article presents a systematic review of the literature examining the relationship between self-talk and performance. "Second-generation questions" regarding potential mediators and moderators of the self-talk-performance relationship were also examined. A total of 47 studies were analyzed. Results indicated beneficial effects of positive, instructional, and motivational self-talk for performance. Somewhat surprisingly, two evidence-based challenges to popular current viewpoints on self-talk emerged. First, negative self-talk did not impede performance.

Author(s): 
Tod, David
Hardy, James
Oliver, Emily
Publication Title: 
Consciousness and Cognition

Meditation comprises a series of practices mainly developed in eastern cultures aiming at controlling emotions and enhancing attentional processes. Several authors proposed to divide meditation techniques in focused attention (FA) and open monitoring (OM) techniques. Previous studies have reported differences in brain networks underlying FA and OM. On the other hand common activations across different meditative practices have been reported.

Author(s): 
Sperduti, Marco
Martinelli, Penelope
Piolino, Pascale
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: As terminal disease progresses, health deteriorates and the end of life approaches, people may ask "Why this illness? Why me? Why now?" Such questions may invoke, rekindle or intensify spiritual or religious concerns. Although the processes by which these associations occur are poorly understood, there is some research evidence for associations that are mainly positive between spiritual and religious awareness and wellness, such as emotional health.

Author(s): 
Candy, Bridget
Jones, Louise
Varagunam, Mira
Speck, Peter
Tookman, Adrian
King, Michael
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology (Oxford, England)

OBJECTIVE: To critically review the evidence on the effectiveness of complementary therapies for patients with RA. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials, published in English up to May 2011, were identified using systematic searches of bibliographic databases and searching of reference lists. Information was extracted on outcomes and statistical significance in comparison with alternative treatments and reported side effects. The methodological quality of the identified studies was determined using the Jadad scoring system.

Author(s): 
Macfarlane, Gary J.
Paudyal, Priya
Doherty, Michael
Ernst, Edzard
Lewith, George
MacPherson, Hugh
Sim, Julius
Jones, Gareth T.
Arthritis Research UK Working Group on Complementary and Alternative Therapies for the Management of the Rheumatic Diseases
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Therapeutic Touch (TT) is an alternative therapy that has gained popularity over the past two decades for helping wounds to heal. Practitioners enter a meditative state and pass their hands above the patient's body to find and correct any imbalances in the patient's 'life energy' or chi. Scientific instruments have been unable to detect this energy. The effect of TT on wound healing has been expounded in anecdotal publications. OBJECTIVES: To identify and review all relevant data to determine the effects of TT on healing acute wounds.

Author(s): 
O'Mathúna, Dónal P.
Ashford, Robert L.
Publication Title: 
Depression and Anxiety

BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders and meditative therapies are frequently sought by patients with anxiety as a complementary therapy. Although multiple reviews exist on the general health benefits of meditation, no review has focused on the efficacy of meditation for anxiety specifically. METHODS: Major medical databases were searched thoroughly with keywords related to various types of meditation and anxiety. Over 1,000 abstracts were screened, and 200+ full articles were reviewed. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included.

Author(s): 
Chen, Kevin W.
Berger, Christine C.
Manheimer, Eric
Forde, Darlene
Magidson, Jessica
Dachman, Laya
Lejuez, C. W.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: In recent years, several clinical trials have assessed effects of distant healing. The basic question raised by these studies is whether a positive distant intention can be related to some outcome in a target person. There is a specific simple experimental setup that tests such a basic assumption. The task is to focus attention and to indicate unwanted mind wandering by a button press while at the same time a second remote person is either supporting this performance or not according to a randomized schedule.

Author(s): 
Schmidt, Stefan

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