Menopause

Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

The purpose of this brief review is to highlight some of the more important advances in endocrinology of aging research over the past year. Four advances were chosen and briefly described.

Author(s): 
Bellino, Francis L.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

A commentary is offered on the chapters that comprise the section on Theoretical Foundations, emphasizing novel contributions of each. Three additional points are then made. First, while the biology of reproductive aging may be common to all human populations, its actual course can be expected to vary between individuals and between populations depending on ecological conditions and developmental histories.

Author(s): 
Ellison, Peter T.
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

In the first paper to present formal theory explaining that senescence is a consequence of natural selection, W. D. Hamilton concluded that human postmenopausal longevity results from the contributions of ancestral grandmothers to the reproduction of their relatives. A grandmother hypothesis, subsequently elaborated with additional lines of evidence, helps explain both exceptional longevity and additional features of life history that distinguish humans from the other great apes.

Author(s): 
Hawkes, Kristen
Publication Title: 
Climacteric: The Journal of the International Menopause Society

Interactions between genetic (genome) and environmental factors (epigenome) operate during a person's entire lifespan. The aging process is associated with several cellular and organic functional alterations that, at the end, cause multi-organic cell failure. Epigenetic mechanisms of aging are modifiable by appropriate preventive actions mediated by sirtuins, caloric input, diet components, adipose tissue-related inflammatory reactions, and physical activity.

Author(s): 
Chedraui, P.
PÈrez-LÛpez, F. R.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Menopause, according to contemporary American and European understanding, signifies the end of menstruation, a universal experience among human females. This definition of menopause is recent in origin, and is not one which is widely accepted, comparatively speaking. Research has shown that meanings and subjective experience, including symptoms, associated with menopause vary cross-culturally. Menopause may not be recognized as a concept, or alternatively is not closely associated with the end of menstruation, nor is it usually considered a difficult time.

Author(s): 
Lock, M.
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

Regression analyses of primate life spans on recently revised female body and brain masses of Old World primates predict a human life span of between 72 years and 91 years-estimates that exceed the age of human menopause (and prior estimates) by well over 20 years. The life spans predicted from body and brain sizes in the early Homo suggest that postreproductive life spans predate Homo sapiens Among anthropoid primates, residual longevity after body and brain effects are controlled is greatest for Homo and for the New World monkeys of the genus Cebus.

Author(s): 
Judge, D. S.
Carey, J. R.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Treatment and Research
Author(s): 
Cobleigh, M. A.
Publication Title: 
Human Biology

The purpose of this study was to review published studies on the variability of age at menarche and age at menopause throughout the world, and to identify the main causes for age variation in the timing of these events. We first present a summary table including mean (or median) values of the age at menarche in 67 countries, and of the age at menopause in 26 countries.

Author(s): 
Thomas, F.
Renaud, F.
Benefice, E.
de Mee¸s, T.
Guegan, J. F.
Publication Title: 
Climacteric: The Journal of the International Menopause Society

The process of aging is accompanied by several modifications in the hemostatic system at different levels (blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, platelet activity, vascular endothelium). These changes may explain the higher incidence of arterial and venous thrombosis in the elderly compared to young people. Genetic and environmental factors modulate in different combinations the expression of proteins involved in the hemostatic process. Among the latter, diet and smoking habits play an important role, as well as physical exercise and, for women, hormonal status.

Author(s): 
Bucciarelli, P.
Mannucci, P. M.
Publication Title: 
Climacteric: The Journal of the International Menopause Society

Interactions between genetic (genome) and environmental factors (epigenome) operate during a person's entire lifespan. The aging process is associated with several cellular and organic functional alterations that, at the end, cause multi-organic cell failure. Epigenetic mechanisms of aging are modifiable by appropriate preventive actions mediated by sirtuins, caloric input, diet components, adipose tissue-related inflammatory reactions, and physical activity.

Author(s): 
Chedraui, P.
PÈrez-LÛpez, F. R.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Menopause