Menopause

Publication Title: 
Maturitas

Large proportions of women have turned to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for relief from their menopausal symptoms. This highlights the need for more rigorous research into CAM. This article is aimed at critically reviewing surveys that examine the prevalence of CAM use by menopausal women worldwide. Eleven databases were searched for peer-reviewed surveys published in any language between 01 January 2000 and 27 October 2012. The bibliographies of the retrieved articles and relevant book chapters were also hand searched.

Author(s): 
Posadzki, P.
Lee, M. S.
Moon, T. W.
Choi, T. Y.
Park, T. Y.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health

INTRODUCTION: Despite questionable efficacy and safety, many women use a variety of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to relieve menopause symptoms. METHODS: We examined the determinants and use of CAM therapies among a sample of menopausal-aged women in Canada by using a cross-sectional Web-based survey. RESULTS: Four hundred twenty-three women who were contacted through list serves, e-mail lists, and Internet advertisements provided complete data on demographics, use of CAM, therapies, and menopausal status and symptoms.

Author(s): 
Lunny, Carole A.
Fraser, Shawn N.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been used for thousands of years around the world. There has been increased interest in utilizing CAM for menopausal symptoms since the release of results of the Women's Health Initiative elucidated long-term adverse effects associated with hormone therapy. Women looking for more natural or safer means to treat hot flushes, night sweats, and other menopausal symptoms often turn to CAM such as yoga, phytoestrogens, or black cohosh. Yet there have been few well-conducted studies looking at the efficacy of these treatments.

Author(s): 
Moore, Thea R.
Franks, Rachel B.
Fox, Carol
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

The results of large clinical trials have led physicians and patients to question the safety of hormone therapy for menopause. In the past, physicians prescribed hormone therapy to improve overall health and prevent cardiac disease, as well as for symptoms of menopause. Combined estrogen/progestogen therapy, but not estrogen alone, increases the risk of breast cancer when used for more than three to five years.

Author(s): 
Hill, D. Ashley
Crider, Mark
Hill, Susan R.
Publication Title: 
Maturitas

OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the peer-reviewed literature regarding the effects of self-administered mind-body therapies on menopausal symptoms. METHODS: To identify qualifying studies, we searched 10 scientific databases and scanned bibliographies of relevant review papers and all identified articles. The methodological quality of all studies was assessed systematically using predefined criteria.

Author(s): 
Innes, Kim E.
Selfe, Terry Kit
Vishnu, Abhishek
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

BACKGROUND: Women commonly use soy products, herbs, and other complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies for menopausal symptoms. Randomized, controlled trials have evaluated the efficacy and short-term safety of these therapies. PURPOSE: To review randomized, controlled trials of CAM therapies for menopausal symptoms in order to better inform practice and guide future research.

Author(s): 
Kronenberg, Fredi
Fugh-Berman, Adriane
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that many perimenopausal and early postmenopausal women will experience menopause symptoms, hot flushes being the most common. Symptoms caused by fluctuating levels of oestrogen may be alleviated by HRT but there has been a marked global decline in its use due to concerns about the risks and benefits of HRT; consequently many women are now seeking alternatives.

Author(s): 
Daley, Amanda
Stokes-Lampard, Helen
Macarthur, Christine
Publication Title: 
Climacteric: The Journal of the International Menopause Society

AIMS: Although most women experience symptom clusters during the menopausal transition and early postmenopause, investigators reporting clinical trial effects for hot flushes often omit co-occurring symptoms. Our aim was to review controlled clinical trials of mind-body therapies for hot flushes and at least one other co-occurring symptom from these groups: sleep, cognitive function, mood, and pain.

Author(s): 
Woods, N. F.
Mitchell, E. S.
Schnall, J. G.
Cray, L.
Ismail, R.
Taylor-Swanson, L.
Thomas, A.
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To update and expand The North American Menopause Society's evidence-based position on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. METHODS: NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees.

Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a treatment option for menopausal symptoms. METHODS: We searched the literature using 14 databases from their inception to July 2008 and included all types of clinical studies regardless of their design. The methodological quality of all studies was assessed using a modified Jadad score. RESULTS: Seven studies met our inclusion criteria. Two randomized clinical trials compared the effects of yoga with those of walking or physical exercise.

Author(s): 
Lee, Myeong Soo
Kim, Jong-In
Ha, Jeong Yong
Boddy, Kate
Ernst, Edzard

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