metabolic syndrome

Publication Title: 
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology

BACKGROUND: Yoga, a popular mind-body practice, may produce changes in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic syndrome risk factors. DESIGN: This was a systematic review and random-effects meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were performed for systematic reviews and RCTs through December 2013. Studies were included if they were English, peer-reviewed, focused on asana-based yoga in adults, and reported relevant outcomes.

Author(s): 
Chu, Paula
Gotink, Rinske A.
Yeh, Gloria Y.
Goldie, Sue J.
Hunink, M. G. Myriam
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology

Background Metabolic syndrome is the most important risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review was to systematically assess and perform a meta-analysis of the effects of yoga on the parameters of metabolic syndrome. Methods MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and IndMED were searched and screened from their inception through to 8 March 2016 for randomised controlled trials on yoga for patients with metabolic syndrome. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Langhorst, Jost
Dobos, Gustav
Lauche, Romy
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Cardiology

BACKGROUND: The aim of this review was to systematically assess and meta-analyze the effects of yoga on modifiable biological cardiovascular disease risk factors in the general population and in high-risk disease groups. METHODS: MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, and IndMED were screened through August 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on yoga for predefined cardiovascular risk factors in healthy participants, non-diabetic participants with high risk for cardiovascular disease, or participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Haller, Heidemarie
Steckhan, Nico
Michalsen, Andreas
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
Pharmacogenomics

AIM: Second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) are known to induce metabolic disturbances. Genetic pathways, such as the IGF pathway could be associated with increased metabolic syndrome (MetS). Additionally, IGF2 methylation varies as a function of environmental influences and is associated with schizophrenia and MetS. The current study aims to evaluate whether genetic and epigenetic variation in genes of the IGF pathway are associated with metabolic disturbances in patients under treatment with SGAs.

Author(s): 
Moons, Tim
De Hert, Marc
Kenis, Gunther
Viechtbauer, Wolfgang
van Os, Jim
Gohlke, Henning
Claes, Stephan
van Winkel, Ruud
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