Metformin

Publication Title: 
Human Reproduction Update

BACKGROUND: Here we describe the consensus guideline methodology, summarise the evidence-based recommendations we provided to the World Health Organisation (WHO) for their consideration in the development of global guidance and present a narrative review on the management of anovulatory infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: The aim of this paper was to present an evidence base for the management of anovulatory PCOS.

Author(s): 
Balen, Adam H.
Morley, Lara C.
Misso, Marie
Franks, Stephen
Legro, Richard S.
Wijeyaratne, Chandrika N.
Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
Fauser, Bart C. J. M.
Norman, Robert J.
Teede, Helena
Publication Title: 
Aging

Metformin, an oral anti-diabetic drug, is being considered increasingly for treatment and prevention of cancer, obesity as well as for the extension of healthy lifespan. Gradually accumulating discrepancies about its effect on cancer and obesity can be explained by the shortage of randomized clinical trials, differences between control groups (reference points), gender- and age-associated effects and pharmacogenetic factors.

Author(s): 
Berstein, Lev M.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Clinical Investigation

Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), has the strongest experimental support to date as a potential anti-aging therapeutic in mammals. Unlike many other compounds that have been claimed to influence longevity, rapamycin has been repeatedly tested in long-lived, genetically heterogeneous mice, in which it extends both mean and maximum life spans. However, the mechanism that accounts for these effects is far from clear, and a growing list of side effects make it doubtful that rapamycin would ultimately be beneficial in humans.

Author(s): 
Lamming, Dudley W.
Ye, Lan
Sabatini, David M.
Baur, Joseph A.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Dietary caloric restriction (CR) is the only intervention conclusively and reproducibly shown to slow aging and maintain health and vitality in mammals. Although this paradigm has been known for over 60 years, its precise biological mechanisms and applicability to humans remain unknown. We began addressing the latter question in 1987 with the first controlled study of CR in primates (rhesus and squirrel monkeys, which are evolutionarily much closer to humans than the rodents most frequently employed in CR studies).

Author(s): 
Roth, G. S.
Ingram, D. K.
Lane, M. A.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

By applying calorie restriction (CR) at 30-50% below ad libitum levels, studies in numerous species have reported increased life span, reduced incidence and delayed onset of age-related diseases, improved stress resistance, and decelerated functional decline. Whether this nutritional intervention is relevant to human aging remains to be determined; however, evidence emerging from CR studies in nonhuman primates suggests that response to CR in primates parallels that observed in rodents. To evaluate CR effects in humans, clinical trials have been initiated.

Author(s): 
Ingram, Donald K.
Anson, R. Michael
de Cabo, Rafael
Mamczarz, Jacek
Zhu, Min
Mattison, Julie
Lane, Mark A.
Roth, George S.
Publication Title: 
Nature
Author(s): 
Spinney, Laura
Publication Title: 
Drug Discovery Today

Numerous mutations increase lifespan in diverse organisms from worms to mammals. Most genes that affect longevity encode components of the target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway, thus revealing potential targets for pharmacological intervention. I propose that one target, TOR itself, stands out, simply because its inhibitor (rapamycin) is a non-toxic, well-tolerated drug that is suitable for everyday oral administration.

Author(s): 
Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.
Publication Title: 
BioFactors (Oxford, England)

Life expectancy at the turn of the 20th century was 46 years on average worldwide and it is around 65 years today. The correlative increase in age-associated diseases incidence has a profound public health impact and is an important matter of concern for our societies. Aging is a complex, heterogeneous, and multifactorial phenomenon, which is the consequence of multiple interactions between genes and environment.

Author(s): 
Mouchiroud, Laurent
Molin, Laurent
DalliËre, Nicolas
Solari, Florence
Publication Title: 
Aging

Studies in mammals have led to the suggestion that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia are important factors in aging. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling molecules that have been linked to longevity include daf-2 and InR and their homologues in mammals, and inactivation of the corresponding genes increases life span in nematodes, fruit flies and mice. It is possible that the life-prolonging effect of caloric restriction is due to decreasing IGF-1 levels.

Author(s): 
Anisimov, Vladimir N.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

The biguanide drug, metformin, commonly used to treat type-2 diabetes, has been shown to extend lifespan and reduce fecundity in C. elegans through a dietary restriction-like mechanism via the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the AMPK-activating kinase, LKB1. We have investigated whether the longevity-promoting effects of metformin are evolutionarily conserved using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

Author(s): 
Slack, Cathy
Foley, Andrea
Partridge, Linda

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