Microbial Viability

Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Microbiology

Shigella spp. (Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri, Shigella boydii and Shigella sonnei) cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis), which is characterized by bloody mucous diarrhoea. Although a variety of antibiotics have been effective for treatment of shigellosis, options are becoming limited due to globally emerging drug resistance. In the present study, in vitro antibacterial activity of methyl gallate (MG) isolated from Terminalia chebula was determined by performing MIC, minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) and time-kill kinetic studies.

Author(s): 
Acharyya, Saurabh
Sarkar, Prodipta
Saha, Dhira R.
Patra, Amarendra
Ramamurthy, T.
Bag, Prasanta K.
Publication Title: 
Genetics

Telomeres are an unusual component of the genome because they do not encode genes, but their structure and cellular maintenance machinery (which we define as "telotype") are essential for chromosome stability. Cells can switch between different phenotypic states. One such example is when they switch from maintenance mediated by telomerase (TERT telotype) to one of the two alternative mechanisms of telomere preservation (ALT I and ALT II telotype). The nature of this switch is largely unknown.

Author(s): 
Makovets, Svetlana
Williams, Tanya L.
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Infectious Diseases

BACKGROUND: Despite the remarkable activity of artemisinin and its derivatives, monotherapy with these agents has been associated with high rates of recrudescence. The temporary arrest of the growth of ring-stage parasites (dormancy) after exposure to artemisinin drugs provides a plausible explanation for this phenomenon. METHODS: Ring-stage parasites of several Plasmodium falciparum lines were exposed to different doses of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) alone or in combination with mefloquine. For each regime, the proportion of recovering parasites was determined daily for 20 days.

Author(s): 
Teuscher, Franka
Gatton, Michelle L.
Chen, Nanhua
Peters, Jennifer
Kyle, Dennis E.
Cheng, Qin
Publication Title: 
BMC microbiology

BACKGROUND: Lactobacillus plantarum is considered as a safe and effective probiotic microorganism. Among various sources of isolation, traditionally fermented foods are considered to be rich in Lactobacillus spp., which can be exploited for their probiotic attribute. Antibacterial property of L. plantarum has been demonstrated against various enteric pathogens in both in vitro and in vivo systems. This study was aimed at characterizing L.

Author(s): 
Kumar, Himanshu
Rangrez, Ashraf Y.
Dayananda, Kannayakanahalli M.
Atre, Ashwini N.
Patole, Milind S.
Shouche, Yogesh S.
Publication Title: 
BMC microbiology

BACKGROUND: Lactobacillus plantarum is considered as a safe and effective probiotic microorganism. Among various sources of isolation, traditionally fermented foods are considered to be rich in Lactobacillus spp., which can be exploited for their probiotic attribute. Antibacterial property of L. plantarum has been demonstrated against various enteric pathogens in both in vitro and in vivo systems. This study was aimed at characterizing L.

Author(s): 
Kumar, Himanshu
Rangrez, Ashraf Y.
Dayananda, Kannayakanahalli M.
Atre, Ashwini N.
Patole, Milind S.
Shouche, Yogesh S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Applied Microbiology

AIMS: To purify and characterize an antimicrobial protein (bacteriocin) isolated from the dairy product-derived Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. METHODS AND RESULTS: An unknown bacterial species cultured from the Yogu Farm probiotic dairy beverage was identified through 16S ribosomal RNA analysis as B. amyloliquefaciens, a phylogenetically close relative of Bacillus subtilis. The cell-free supernatant (CFS) of overnight cultures was active against Listeria monocytogenes and also against clinical isolates of Gardnerella vaginalis and Streptococcus agalactiae.

Author(s): 
Sutyak, K. E.
Wirawan, R. E.
Aroutcheva, A. A.
Chikindas, M. L.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

OBJECTIVES: The stationary phase of Clostridium difficile, which is primarily responsible for diarrhoeal symptoms, is refractory to antibiotic killing. We investigated whether disrupting the functions of the clostridial membrane is an approach to control C. difficile infections by promptly removing growing and non-growing cells. METHODS: The bactericidal activities of various membrane-active agents were determined against C. difficile logarithmic-phase and stationary-phase cultures and compared with known antibiotics.

Author(s): 
Wu, Xiaoqian
Cherian, Philip T.
Lee, Richard E.
Hurdle, Julian G.
Publication Title: 
Microbiological Research

The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible in vitro antibacterial potential of extracts of Eugenia jambolana seeds against multidrug-resistant human bacterial pathogens. Agar well diffusion and microbroth dilution assay methods were used for antibacterial susceptibility testing. Kill-kinetics study was done to know the rate and extent of bacterial killing. Phytochemical analysis and TLC-bioautography were performed by colour tests to characterize the putative compounds responsible for this antibacterial activity.

Author(s): 
Bag, Anwesa
Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar
Pal, Nishith Kumar
Chattopadhyay, Rabi Ranjan
Publication Title: 
BMC microbiology

BACKGROUND: Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic yeast routinely used to prevent and to treat gastrointestinal disorders, including the antibiotic-associated diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile infections. However, only 1-3% of the yeast administered orally is recovered alive in the feces suggesting that this yeast is unable to survive the acidic environment of the gastrointestinal tract. RESULTS: We provide evidence that suggests that S.

Author(s): 
Cascio, Vincent
Gittings, Daniel
Merloni, Kristen
Hurton, Matthew
Laprade, David
Austriaco, Nicanor
Publication Title: 
Cell Metabolism

We have explored the role of mitochondrial function in aging by genetically and pharmacologically modifying yeast cellular respiration production during the exponential and/or stationary growth phases and determining how this affects chronological life span (CLS). Our results demonstrate that respiration is essential during both growth phases for standard CLS, but that yeast have a large respiratory capacity, and only deficiencies below a threshold (~40% of wild-type) significantly curtail CLS.

Author(s): 
Ocampo, Alejandro
Liu, Jingjing
Schroeder, Elizabeth A.
Shadel, Gerald S.
Barrientos, Antoni

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