Middle Aged

Publication Title: 
Psycho-Oncology

OBJECTIVE: This meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on the mental and physical health status of various cancer patients. METHODS: Ten studies (randomized-controlled trials and observational studies) were found to be eligible for meta-analysis. Individual study results were categorized into mental and physical variables and Cohen's effect size d was computed for each category.

Author(s): 
Ledesma, Dianne
Kumano, Hiroaki
Publication Title: 
Pain

An increasing number of studies consider the specific processes by which distressing sensations, thoughts, and emotional experiences exert their influence on the daily functioning of those who suffer with chronic pain. Clinical methods of mindfulness and the processes that underlie them appear to have clear implications in this area, but have not been systematically investigated to this point in time. The purpose of the present study was to examine mindfulness in relation to the pain, emotional, physical, and social functioning of individuals with chronic pain.

Author(s): 
McCracken, Lance M.
Gauntlett-Gilbert, Jeremy
Vowles, Kevin E.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology

BACKGROUND: Due to new treatment modalities in the last decades, a decline in cardiovascular deaths has been observed. There is an emerging field of secondary prevention and behavioural programmes with increased interest in the use of mind-body practices. Until now, these have not been established in cardiovascular disease treatment programmes. DESIGN: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available evidence on the effectiveness of mind-body practices for patients with diagnosed cardiac disease.

Author(s): 
Younge, John O.
Gotink, Rinske A.
Baena, Cristina P.
Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.
Hunink, M. G. Myriam
Publication Title: 
Eating Disorders

The present study is an exploratory examination of the efficacy of the application of mindfulness-based interventions to the treatment of eating disorders. It employs a systematic review technique in which terms from the Psychological Index Terms of the American Psychological Association (APA) were chosen and analyzed in conjunction with Boolean operators. Using data obtained by the online consultation of references from 12 different bibliographical databases, 8 studies were included in the systematic review.

Author(s): 
Wanden-Berghe, Rocío Guardiola
Sanz-Valero, Javier
Wanden-Berghe, Carmina
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Research supports the use of supervised exercise training as a primary therapy for improving the functional status of people with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Several reviews have focused on reporting the outcomes of exercise interventions, but none have critically examined the quality of intervention reporting. Adequate reporting of the exercise protocols used in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is central to interpreting study findings and translating effective interventions into practice.

Author(s): 
Tew, Garry A.
Brabyn, Sally
Cook, Liz
Peckham, Emily
Publication Title: 
Issues in Mental Health Nursing

In the United States, the prevalence of depression is quite high-9% in the general population-with women, young adults, and seniors particularly vulnerable. In recent years, increasing numbers of people are turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for relief from depression and other mental health problems. One form of CAM, yoga, has been growing in popularity; this rise in popularity has, in part, been driven by interest in how this practice, with its mindfulness and meditation aspects, may decrease depression.

Author(s): 
Louie, Lila
Publication Title: 
Manual Therapy

BACKGROUND: Neck pain (NP) is disabling and costly. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of exercise on pain, disability, function, patient satisfaction, quality of life (QoL) and global perceived effect (GPE) in adults with NP. METHODS: We searched computerised databases up to May 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing exercise to a control in adults with NP with/without cervicogenic headache (CGH) or radiculopathy. Two reviewers independently conducted selection, data abstraction and assessed risk of bias.

Author(s): 
Gross, A. R.
Paquin, J. P.
Dupont, G.
Blanchette, S.
Lalonde, P.
Cristie, T.
Graham, N.
Kay, T. M.
Burnie, S. J.
Gelley, G.
Goldsmith, C. H.
Forget, M.
Santaguida, P. L.
Yee, A. J.
Radisic, G. G.
Hoving, J. L.
Bronfort, G.
Cervical Overview Group
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Clinical Psychology

PURPOSE: An emerging body of evidence has shown the therapeutic effect of both mindful and non-mindful physical exercises on the treatment of depression. The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of mindful and non-mindful physical exercises as an intervention in managing depression or depressive symptoms based on a systematic literature review. METHODS: Our review was conducted among five electronic databases to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which tested the effects of mindful or/and non-mindful physical exercises on depression.

Author(s): 
Tsang, Hector W. H.
Chan, Edward P.
Cheung, W. M.
Publication Title: 
Climacteric: The Journal of the International Menopause Society

A number of health and lifestyle factors are thought to contribute to cognitive decline associated with age but cannot be easily modified by the individual patient. We identified 12 individually modifiable interventions that can be implemented during midlife or later with the potential to ameliorate cognitive aging. For ten of these, we used PubMed databases for a systematic review of long-duration (at least 6 months), randomized, controlled trials in midlife and older adults without dementia or mild cognitive impairment with objective measures of neuropsychological performance.

Author(s): 
Lehert, P.
Villaseca, P.
Hogervorst, E.
Maki, P. M.
Henderson, V. W.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

With a rapidly aging society it becomes increasingly important to counter normal age-related decline in cognitive functioning. Growing evidence suggests that cognitive training programs may have the potential to counteract this decline. On the basis of a growing body of research that shows that meditation has positive effects on cognition in younger and middle-aged adults, meditation may be able to offset normal age-related cognitive decline or even enhance cognitive function in older adults.

Author(s): 
Gard, Tim
Hölzel, Britta K.
Lazar, Sara W.

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