Minerals

Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

BACKGROUND: Despite the widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the general population for the treatment of chronic diseases, only few data have been published for patients with leukemia. The aim of this survey was to study systematically the use of CAM in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A structured questionnaire was sent to 247 CLL patients of all clinical stages and disease durations, treated and untreated. The questionnaire was returned anonymously by 87 patients (35%).

Author(s): 
Hensel, Manfred
Zoz, Martin
Ho, Anthony D.
Publication Title: 
The Spine Journal: Official Journal of the North American Spine Society

The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing amongst available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited health-care resources to support interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient.

Author(s): 
Gagnier, Joel J.
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

We illustrate the 'vital sensation' of mineral-based homeopathic medicines as revealed by an interview style based on a synthesis of the Bombay method and Scholten's, understanding derived from the periodic table. The 'Bombay method', described by Rajan Sankaran, builds on homeopathic teaching giving a structure to guide the gathering and synthesising homeopathic data. The concept of 'levels' gives a route to the deepest reflection of the vital disturbance, the vital sensation.

Author(s): 
Thompson, E. A.
Geraghty, J.
Publication Title: 
Arzneimittel-Forschung

The increasing interest in alternative medical practices has led to a number of controlled studies on herbal and homeopathic agents. This paper presents the results of a meta-analysis of four recent clinical trials evaluating the homeopathic preparation Vertigoheel (VH) compared with usual therapies (betahistine, Ginkgo biloba extract, dimenhydrinate) for vertigo in a total of 1388 patients. Two trials were observational studies and the other two were randomised double-blind controlled trials. The duration of treatment (6-8 weeks) and dosage were comparable in all studies.

Author(s): 
Schneider, Berthold
Klein, Peter
Weiser, Michael
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Homeopathic medicines are used by patients with cancer, often alongside conventional treatment. Cancer treatments can cause considerable morbidity and one of the reasons patients use homeopathic medicines is to help with adverse effects. OBJECTIVES: Evaluate effectiveness and safety of homeopathic medicines used to prevent or treat adverse effects of cancer treatments.

Author(s): 
Kassab, Sosie
Cummings, Mike
Berkovitz, Saul
Van Haselen, Robbert
Fisher, Peter
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Shilajit is a multi-component natural occurring mineral substance used in Ayurveda and Siddha systems of medicine which originated in India. Its source can be traced to the mountainous regions, where the hilly tribes first identified its beneficial use. Shilajit is aptly referred to as 'rasayana'/'rasayanam' in Ayurveda and Siddha literature which means rejuvenator because it prevents ailment and enhances the quality of life.

Author(s): 
Wilson, Eugene
Rajamanickam, G. Victor
Dubey, G. Prasad
Klose, Petra
Musial, Frauke
Saha, F. Joyonto
Rampp, Thomas
Michalsen, Andreas
Dobos, Gustav J.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Public Health

OBJECTIVES: Vitamin and mineral supplementation is a common practice in the United States, yet little is known about the long-term health effects of regular supplement use. METHODS: To examine the relationship between reported use of supplements and mortality, we analyzed data from US adults 25 to 74 years of age who were examined in the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1971 to 1975), with vital status determined through 1987. RESULTS: At baseline, 22.5% of the cohort reported using supplements regularly and 10.0% reported irregular use.

Author(s): 
Kim, I.
Williamson, D. F.
Byers, T.
Koplan, J. P.

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