Models, Animal

Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

INTRODUCTION: This is a systematic review of the animal models used in studies of high dilutions. The objectives are to analyze methodological quality of papers and reported results, and to highlight key conceptual aspects of high dilution to suggest clues concerning putative mechanisms of action. METHODS: Papers for inclusion were identified systematically, from the Pubmed-Medline database, using 'Homeopathy' and 'Animal' as keywords.

Author(s): 
Bonamin, Leoni Villano
Endler, Peter Christian
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

BACKGROUND: In the 1990s, a study was performed on the effects of highly diluted thyroxine on frog metamorphosis. This model represented one of the most discussed examples of the biological effects of high dilutions over the next two decades. In 2010, another critical conceptual review of the use of animal models in homeopathy and high-dilution research was published.

Author(s): 
Bonamin, Leoni Villano
Cardoso, Thayná Neves
de Carvalho, Aloísio Cunha
Amaral, Juliana Gimenez
Publication Title: 
Acupuncture in Medicine: Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is the most devastating subtype of stroke, but there is currently no evidence-based treatment strategy. Acupuncture is a well-known traditional Chinese therapy for stroke-induced disability, and GV20 is the commonly used acupuncture point. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of GV20-based acupuncture in animal models of acute ICH. METHODS: Studies of GV20-based acupuncture in animal models of acute ICH were identified from six databases up to July 2013.

Author(s): 
Li, Hui-Qin
Li, Ji-Huang
Liu, Ai-Ju
Ye, Mai-yun
Zheng, Guo-Qing
Publication Title: 
Drug Research

Wound is defined as the loss of breaking cellular and functional continuity of the living tissues. Management of wounds is frequently encountered with different problems. Drug resistance and toxicity hindered the development of synthetic antimicrobial agents with wound healing activity. Many plants with potent pharmacological activities may offer better treatment options viz.

Author(s): 
Khan, A. A.
Kumar, V.
Singh, B. K.
Singh, R.
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

A major challenge in current research into aging using model organisms is to establish whether different treatments resulting in slowed aging involve common or distinct mechanisms. Such treatments include gene mutation, dietary restriction (DR), and manipulation of reproduction, gonadal signals and temperature. The principal method used to determine whether these treatments act through common mechanisms is to compare the magnitude of the effect on aging of each treatment separately with that when two are applied simultaneously.

Author(s): 
Gems, David
Pletcher, Scott
Partridge, Linda
Publication Title: 
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

It is widely held that caloric restriction (CR) extends lifespan by preventing or reducing the age-related accumulation of irreversible molecular damage. In contrast, our results suggest that CR can act rapidly to begin life and health span extension, and that its rapid genomic effects are closely linked to its health effects. We found that CR begins to extend lifespan and reduce cancer as a cause of death within 8 weeks in older mice, apparently by reducing the rate of tumor growth.

Author(s): 
Spindler, Stephen R.
Publication Title: 
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

An association between aging/longevity and cancer has long been suggested, yet the evolutionary and molecular links between these complicated traits remain elusive. Here, we analyze the relationship between longevity- and cancer-associated genes/proteins (LAGs/LAPs and CAGs/CAPs, respectively). Specifically, we address the following questions: (1) to what extent the CAGs and LAGs are evolutionary conserved and how they (or their orthologs) are related to each other in diverse species?

Author(s): 
Budovsky, Arie
Tacutu, Robi
Yanai, Hagai
Abramovich, Amir
Wolfson, Marina
Fraifeld, Vadim
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

Major advances in aging research have been made by studying the effect of genetic modifications on the lifespan of organisms, such as yeast, invertebrates (worms and flies) and mice. Data from yeast and invertebrates have been the most plentiful because of the ease in which genetic manipulations can be made and the rapidity by which lifespan experiments can be performed. With the ultimate focus on advancing human health, testing genetic interventions in mammals is crucial, and the mouse has proven to be the mammal most amenable to this task.

Author(s): 
Ladiges, Warren
Van Remmen, Holly
Strong, Randy
Ikeno, Yuji
Treuting, Piper
Rabinovitch, Peter
Richardson, Arlan
Publication Title: 
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Dry bean consumption has been reported to be associated with reduced risk for a number of chronic diseases including cancer. The extent to which these benefits are associated with primary versus secondary plant metabolites is not known. The work reported herein focuses on low molecular weight secondary metabolites and uses longevity extension of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes as a surrogate marker for human health benefits.

Author(s): 
Mensack, Meghan M.
Fitzgerald, Vanessa K.
Lewis, Matthew R.
Thompson, Henry J.
Publication Title: 
Fly

Understanding the causes of aging is a complex problem due to the multiple factors that influence aging, which include genetics, environment, metabolism and reproduction, among others. These multiple factors create logistical difficulties in the evaluation of anti-aging agents. There is a need for good model systems to evaluate potential anti-aging compounds.

Author(s): 
Jafari, Mahtab

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