Models, Educational

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To explore First Year medical students' rating of CAM therapies following a core teaching session. To determine the influence of student gender and previous experience of CAM and therapist/teacher gender and professional background on ratings. DESIGN: Survey; self-administered questionnaire following a teaching session. SETTING: First Year medical students Behavioural Science module CAM teaching session, University of Birmingham Medical School, UK. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty (71.0%) students completed a questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Greenfield, S. M.
Innes, M. A.
Allan, T. F.
Wearn, A. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health Nursing

To meet the challenge of preparing nurses for delivery of health care that is directed toward health promotion and focused on populations at the community level, it is critical that academicians develop new methods to educate their students. In this article, I describe an innovative clinical practice model in which an academic-community partnership was created between a college of nursing and a neighborhood grade school and parish.

Author(s): 
Lough, M. A.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Research

BACKGROUND: Standard histories of the nurse training school movement have focused on national leaders and organizations and have generally not included Catholic sisters, even though nuns had established approximately 220 nursing schools by 1915. OBJECTIVES: This study asks how Catholic sisters used their distinct understanding of nursing to shape their nursing schools and the nurse training movement in the United States between 1890 and 1920.

Author(s): 
Wall, B. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Youth and Adolescence

Guided by the integrative model of parenting, the present study investigated the relationship between parental monitoring and racial/ethnic minority adolescents' school engagement and academic motivation as a function of parental warmth, and explored whether these associations varied for boys and girls. Participants (60 % female) were 208 sixth through eighth grade students (63 % African American, 19 % Latino, 18 % Multiracial) from an urban middle school in the Midwestern United States.

Author(s): 
Lowe, Katie
Dotterer, Aryn M.
Publication Title: 
Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America

Nursing is facing challenges perhaps unparalleled in its history. As we face the opportunities of the future, mentors play a more important role than ever.

Author(s): 
Goran, S. F.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

The need to teach professionalism during residency has been affirmed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which will require documentation of education and evaluation of professionalism by 2007. Recently the American Academy of Pediatrics has proposed the following components of professionalism be taught and measured: honesty/integrity, reliability/responsibility, respect for others, compassion/empathy, self-improvement, self-awareness/knowledge of limits, communication/collaboration, and altruism/advocacy.

Author(s): 
Klein, Eileen J.
Jackson, J. Craig
Kratz, Lyn
Marcuse, Edgar K.
McPhillips, Heather A.
Shugerman, Richard P.
Watkins, Sandra
Stapleton, F. Bruder
Publication Title: 
Nursing Administration Quarterly

Human caring, while instinctive, can also be taught, learned, and measured through the nursing education system. For decades information has been obtained that suggests people enter nursing because they value interpersonal relationships, altruism, and a desire to help others. Building on this "caring ethic," nursing students can be professionally trained so that the very best in nursing comes through in their practice. By using nursing theory, students realize their potential while gaining all requisite skills and competencies of today's practicing nurse.

Author(s): 
Woodward, Wendy
Publication Title: 
Perspectives in Biology and Medicine

The Flexner Report had its roots in the recognition in the mid-19th century that medical knowledge is not something fixed but something that grows and evolves. This new view of medical knowledge led to a recasting of the goal of medical education as that of instilling the proper techniques of acquiring and evaluating information rather than merely inculcating facts through rote memorization.

Author(s): 
Ludmerer, Kenneth M.
Publication Title: 
Medical Education

CONTEXT: Empathy and compassion are important catalysts for the healing process, but some research suggests their decline during training and practice. Compassion involves recognition, understanding, emotional resonance and empathic concern for another's concerns, distress, pain and suffering, coupled with their acknowledgement, and motivation and relational action to ameliorate these conditions. COMPASSION, ALTRUISM AND REWARD: Neuroscientists have identified neural networks that generate shared representations of directly experienced and observed feelings, sensations and actions.

Author(s): 
Lown, Beth A.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To explore First Year medical students' rating of CAM therapies following a core teaching session. To determine the influence of student gender and previous experience of CAM and therapist/teacher gender and professional background on ratings. DESIGN: Survey; self-administered questionnaire following a teaching session. SETTING: First Year medical students Behavioural Science module CAM teaching session, University of Birmingham Medical School, UK. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty (71.0%) students completed a questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Greenfield, S. M.
Innes, M. A.
Allan, T. F.
Wearn, A. M.

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