Mortality

Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

To investigate whether mice genetically unaltered by many generations of laboratory selection exhibit similar hormonal and demographic responses to caloric restriction (CR) as laboratory rodents, we performed CR on cohorts of genetically heterogeneous male mice which were grandoffspring of wild-caught ancestors.

Author(s): 
Harper, James M.
Leathers, Charles W.
Austad, Steven N.
Publication Title: 
Nature Communications

Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition increases longevity and delays the onset of age-associated disorders in short-lived species, from unicellular organisms to laboratory mice and rats. The value of CR as a tool to understand human ageing relies on translatability of CR's effects in primates. Here we show that CR significantly improves age-related and all-cause survival in monkeys on a long-term ~30% restricted diet since young adulthood.

Author(s): 
Colman, Ricki J.
Beasley, T. Mark
Kemnitz, Joseph W.
Johnson, Sterling C.
Weindruch, Richard
Anderson, Rozalyn M.
Publication Title: 
California Medicine

Records of deaths among California chiropractors in a five-year period were studied to ascertain causes of death and other characteristics-especially because of the author's interest in ascertaining whether leukemia and other deleterious effects of ionizing radiation could be observed among this occupationally-exposed group.

Author(s): 
Ravenholt, R. T.
Publication Title: 
Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Geriatrics

AIM: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a Tai Chi Yuttari-exercise based care prevention program aimed at frail elderly people on new care-need certification and mortality. METHODS: Participants were elderly individuals (≥65 years of age) who lived in Kitakata City and who had experienced a fall in the past year but were not receiving support or long-term care. Those who agreed to participate in the exercise program were the intervention group (n=34), and those who did not participate were the control group (n=84).

Author(s): 
Fujimoto, Satoshi
Yamazaki, Sachiko
Wakabayashi, Akitsu
Matsuzaki, Yumi
Yasumura, Seiji
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Epidemiology

Moderate-intensity exercise has attracted considerable attention because of its safety and many health benefits. Tai Chi, a form of mind-body exercise that originated in ancient China, has been gaining popularity. Practicing Tai Chi may improve overall health and well-being; however, to our knowledge, no study has evaluated its relationship with mortality. We assessed the associations of regular exercise and specifically participation in Tai Chi, walking, and jogging with total and cause-specific mortality among 61,477 Chinese men in the Shanghai Men's Health Study (2002-2009).

Author(s): 
Wang, Na
Zhang, Xianglan
Xiang, Yong-Bing
Li, Honglan
Yang, Gong
Gao, Jing
Zheng, Wei
Shu, Xiao-Ou
Publication Title: 
Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Geriatrics

AIM: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a Tai Chi Yuttari-exercise based care prevention program aimed at frail elderly people on new care-need certification and mortality. METHODS: Participants were elderly individuals (≥65 years of age) who lived in Kitakata City and who had experienced a fall in the past year but were not receiving support or long-term care. Those who agreed to participate in the exercise program were the intervention group (n=34), and those who did not participate were the control group (n=84).

Author(s): 
Fujimoto, Satoshi
Yamazaki, Sachiko
Wakabayashi, Akitsu
Matsuzaki, Yumi
Yasumura, Seiji
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Epidemiology

Moderate-intensity exercise has attracted considerable attention because of its safety and many health benefits. Tai Chi, a form of mind-body exercise that originated in ancient China, has been gaining popularity. Practicing Tai Chi may improve overall health and well-being; however, to our knowledge, no study has evaluated its relationship with mortality. We assessed the associations of regular exercise and specifically participation in Tai Chi, walking, and jogging with total and cause-specific mortality among 61,477 Chinese men in the Shanghai Men's Health Study (2002-2009).

Author(s): 
Wang, Na
Zhang, Xianglan
Xiang, Yong-Bing
Li, Honglan
Yang, Gong
Gao, Jing
Zheng, Wei
Shu, Xiao-Ou

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